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Open Hardware: Raspberry Pi and RISC-V

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Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Pico vs Zero: The Differences
  • Raspberry Pi & Machine Learning: All You Need to Know
  • There's a hack to add CarPlay support to a Tesla | AppleInsider

    That video feed is supplied by a collection of hardware carried inside the vehicle, which is used to run Android. The assembly includes a pair of Raspberry Pi units, with one used for Android and the other using Linux and handling video and connectivity duties.

  • Tesla Refuses To Integrate Apple's CarPlay — You Can Do It Anyway | Benzinga

    The solution uses a cheap computer development platform Raspberry Pi with a mobile network modem and a wireless internet access point running an Android-based system, micro-HDMI to HDMI cable, and an Ethernet cable. As shown in his YouTube video, the car connects to the device's network and displays the CarPlay interface on its screen inside the web browser — including applications such as Maps and Apple Music. The solution works while driving and can even be controlled with the media buttons present on the car's steering wheel.

  • Lilbits: MIPS pivots to RISC-V, Intel staggers desktop Arc graphics release, and Google releases I/O Pinball

    Last year MIPS Technologies announced that it was going to stop designing MIPS processors. That might sound surprising given the company’s name, but maybe it was inevitable when looking at trends in the semiconductor industry.

    So MIPS pivoted to RISC-V architecture. And the company’s first chips based on that open instruction set are set to launch later this year. MIPS is promising best-in-class performance, but we’ll likely have to wait until this fall to find out whether the company can deliver on that promise.

  • MIPS says first RISC-V chips coming in Q4 2022 • The Register

    MIPS is back, but this time the company is bringing processors to market based on the RISC-V open instruction set architecture, rather than the MIPS architecture the chip designer is synonymous with.

    The current incarnation* of MIPS proclaimed its entry to the RISC-V market with a preview of the first products in its new eVocore processor line, which initially comprises two multiprocessor IP cores, the eVocore P8700 and I8500.

    MIPS said that the new processors are designed for high-performance, real-time compute applications such as networking, datacenter, and the automotive industry.

    To deliver on this goal, the eVocore IP cores was developed around scalability. MIPS said it aims to allow customers to specify custom chip configurations that combine coherent clusters of the multi-threaded, multi-core CPUs to match their power and performance requirements.

  • RISC-V CEO: Winning over giants like Intel key to growth • The Register

    The CEO of RISC-V's governing body says she wants to nothing less than "world domination" for the rising open-source processor technology, but to do that, the nonprofit needs buy-in from a variety of organizations, even those steeped in dominant, proprietary architectures, such as x86 giant Intel.

    In an interview this week with The Register, RISC-V International CEO Calista Redmond reckons the buy-in, which comes in the form of paid memberships, is needed to support ongoing development of the royalty-free CPU instruction set architecture to better compete with x86 and Arm ISAs.

More in Tux Machines

Proprietary Systems: Chromebooks, Windows, and Microsoft’s xClown

New GNU Releases and FSF Spring "Bulletin"

  • June GNU Spotlight with Amin Bandali: Twelve new GNU releases! [Ed: Much respect to Amin Bandali for stepping up and helping the FSF a lot when it needed it the most]
  • Spring "Bulletin": Verifying licenses, free software in education, and more!

    Software freedom needs our advocacy, our words and voices, and our generosity to spread. The biannual Free Software Foundation Bulletin is an item made for sharing, its articles from FSF staff and community members help facilitate the conversation about the importance of free software in daily life. It is a great tool to help people find their reason to support free software, to contribute to free software, or -- for the many who are just learning about it -- to take their next steps up the ladder to freedom.

pgAdmin 4 v6.11 Released

The pgAdmin Development Team is pleased to announce pgAdmin 4 version 6.11. This release of pgAdmin 4 includes 20 bug fixes and new features. For more details please see the release notes. pgAdmin is the leading Open Source graphical management tool for PostgreSQL. For more information, please see the website. Read more Also: PostgreSQL: Announcing the release of AgensGraph 2.12

today's leftovers

  • The Month in WordPress – June 2022 – WordPress News

    With WordPress 6.1 already in the works, a lot of updates happened during June. Here’s a summary to catch up on the ones you may have missed.

  • Join the LibreOffice Team as a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d), 10-20h per week, remote

    To provide high quality tools for our contributors, together working on office productivity for over 200 million users around the globe, we are searching for a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d) to start work as soon as possible.

  • Unravelling complexity in a software-defined vehicles industry | Ubuntu

    Vehicles are becoming more connected, autonomous, shared and electric (the famous CASE acronym). While customers expect new features and upgradability, the software and hardware components enabling such innovations require a different system architecture to function. This is a major change for the automotive industry as it requires new software skills, methodologies and business models. At the same time, automotive manufacturers need to adhere to complex and strict industry standards, and uphold safety-critical functions. In this post, we will focus on the different challenges the industry is facing in terms of hardware and software complexity, cybersecurity and safety. We will also discuss how Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) can learn from software companies to survive this transition towards software-defined vehicles and succeed. [...] On top of this, regulations are becoming very strict, forcing OEMs to provide patches and fixes to common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE). Taking into account the previously detailed system complexity, it is becoming increasingly necessary to move towards a software-defined holistic context. Only a software-defined approach can provide the required flexibility and scalability that allows companies to comply with regulatory requirements while providing UX updates and handling hardware complexity. Of course, cybersecurity never only relies on software. Hardware vulnerabilities can also occur and usually lead to even worse consequences. Some hardware issues can be patched via software, but usually these CVEs remain valid throughout the system’s lifetime. For example, Meltdown and Spectre, two of the most widespread hardware vulnerabilities in the world, are still present and affecting tons of devices. This means that during hardware conception, cybersecurity must be taken into account in the specifications and system architecture in order to limit these vulnerabilities.