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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Top SDS Object Storage Solutions and Why IBM Rarely Makes the List

    Early on, Cleversafe made a name for itself and started to win some very impressive customer deals. They also had an amazing patent portfolio. All of which eventually caught the attention of IBM. And by the Fall of 2015, the official announcement came, IBM was acquiring Cleversafe.

    The transition to Big Blue was pretty rough. That isn’t uncommon with acquisitions. The reason for the acquisition was immediately made clear: IBM was behind in the Cloud Computing sector and instead of building a solution from the ground up, they acquired an already established technology. Their focus: the Hybrid Cloud. They needed to catch up to Amazon, Microsoft and Google. What we did not know at the time was that prior to our acquisition, IBM did attempt building its own object storage solution but it either was not progressing quick enough or the project failed to achieve its goals.

  • How to use Operators with AWS Controllers for Kubernetes | Red Hat Developer

    This is the first of two articles that show how to simplify the management of services offered for Kubernetes by Amazon Web Services (AWS), through the use of Amazon's AWS Controllers for Kubernetes (ACK). You'll also learn how to use an Operator to simplify installation further on Red Hat OpenShift clusters. Together, these tools provide standardized and familiar interfaces to AWS services from a Kubernetes environment.

  • All about local and self-managed Kafka distributions | Red Hat Developer

    Apache Kafka derives great value not just from its technical features and performance, but from the ecosystem that surrounds it. This article is the first part of a two-part series describing the many ways to run Kafka, and the benefits of each. We'll cover distributions for local development, self-managed Kafka, Kafka as a Service, and "serverless-like" Kafka. The series ends with a summary of when to use each type of distribution.

  • Digital exhaustion: Redefining work-life balance [Ed: This is the same IBM that said its employees are "IBM employees 100% of the time"]

    The hybrid workplace is here to stay, so let’s get our heads around it.

    In a recent report from Accenture, 83 percent of workers prefer a hybrid working model, where they can split time between the office and a remote environment.

    This trend is not surprising; with the world entering year three of the pandemic, many workplaces have shifted at least partially online, and the working world has adjusted to a radically different rhythm.

  • Hybrid work: 3 new rules for enabling your workforce [Ed: But IBM is fighting against people whom it initially allowed to work from home]

    Prior to the pandemic, remote employees comprised six percent of the total workforce. In that office-centric era, those not physically working in the office often dealt with slow VPNs, cumbersome layers of security, limited access, and other factors that degraded their experience.

    The rapid adoption of remote work forced everyone into a digital environment and caused widespread compromise around security and human connection. A two-dimensional engagement model has enabled productivity but also brought screen fatigue and a lack of personal connectivity. The transition to hybrid work and returning to physical offices may actually accelerate these challenges – along with employees’ frustration levels.

More in Tux Machines

Proprietary Systems: Chromebooks, Windows, and Microsoft’s xClown

New GNU Releases and FSF Spring "Bulletin"

  • June GNU Spotlight with Amin Bandali: Twelve new GNU releases! [Ed: Much respect to Amin Bandali for stepping up and helping the FSF a lot when it needed it the most]
  • Spring "Bulletin": Verifying licenses, free software in education, and more!

    Software freedom needs our advocacy, our words and voices, and our generosity to spread. The biannual Free Software Foundation Bulletin is an item made for sharing, its articles from FSF staff and community members help facilitate the conversation about the importance of free software in daily life. It is a great tool to help people find their reason to support free software, to contribute to free software, or -- for the many who are just learning about it -- to take their next steps up the ladder to freedom.

pgAdmin 4 v6.11 Released

The pgAdmin Development Team is pleased to announce pgAdmin 4 version 6.11. This release of pgAdmin 4 includes 20 bug fixes and new features. For more details please see the release notes. pgAdmin is the leading Open Source graphical management tool for PostgreSQL. For more information, please see the website. Read more Also: PostgreSQL: Announcing the release of AgensGraph 2.12

today's leftovers

  • The Month in WordPress – June 2022 – WordPress News

    With WordPress 6.1 already in the works, a lot of updates happened during June. Here’s a summary to catch up on the ones you may have missed.

  • Join the LibreOffice Team as a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d), 10-20h per week, remote

    To provide high quality tools for our contributors, together working on office productivity for over 200 million users around the globe, we are searching for a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d) to start work as soon as possible.

  • Unravelling complexity in a software-defined vehicles industry | Ubuntu

    Vehicles are becoming more connected, autonomous, shared and electric (the famous CASE acronym). While customers expect new features and upgradability, the software and hardware components enabling such innovations require a different system architecture to function. This is a major change for the automotive industry as it requires new software skills, methodologies and business models. At the same time, automotive manufacturers need to adhere to complex and strict industry standards, and uphold safety-critical functions. In this post, we will focus on the different challenges the industry is facing in terms of hardware and software complexity, cybersecurity and safety. We will also discuss how Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) can learn from software companies to survive this transition towards software-defined vehicles and succeed. [...] On top of this, regulations are becoming very strict, forcing OEMs to provide patches and fixes to common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE). Taking into account the previously detailed system complexity, it is becoming increasingly necessary to move towards a software-defined holistic context. Only a software-defined approach can provide the required flexibility and scalability that allows companies to comply with regulatory requirements while providing UX updates and handling hardware complexity. Of course, cybersecurity never only relies on software. Hardware vulnerabilities can also occur and usually lead to even worse consequences. Some hardware issues can be patched via software, but usually these CVEs remain valid throughout the system’s lifetime. For example, Meltdown and Spectre, two of the most widespread hardware vulnerabilities in the world, are still present and affecting tons of devices. This means that during hardware conception, cybersecurity must be taken into account in the specifications and system architecture in order to limit these vulnerabilities.