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Rocky Linux 8.6 Is Now Available for Download, Based on RHEL 8.6

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Coming hot on the heels of both Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.6 and AlmaLinux OS 8.6, Rocky Linux 8.6 is here to add support for newer versions of language runtimes, including PHP 8.0 and Perl 5.32 programming languages, both providing multiple bug fixes and enhancements, including support for structured metadata syntax, support for Unicode 13, order-independent arguments, a new experimental infix operator, and faster feature checks.

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What is Rocky Linux – Key Information and Overview

  • What is Rocky Linux – Key Information and Overview

    Rocky Linux is a Linux distribution that is a 100% compatible rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Rocky Linux is maintained by the Rocky Linux Foundation.

    The Foundation and distribution are led by Gregory M. Kurtzer, one of CentOS’s original founders.
    Rocky Linux is now very popular both with individuals and large organizations and considered an unofficial successor of CentOS Linux.

    In this article, we’ll try to give you an overview of Rocky Linux and what you need to know about it.

RHEL Clone and CentOS Replacement Releases Rocky Linux 8.6

  • RHEL Clone and CentOS Replacement Releases Rocky Linux 8.6

    Rocky Linux, a Red Hat Enterprise Linux clone and legacy CentOS replacement, announced on Tuesday the release of Rocky Linux 8.6. The release comes five days after the release of AlmaLinux 8.6 and about a week after the release of RHEL 8.6 at last week’s Red Hat Summit in Boston.

    Rocky and Alma are both vying for dominance in the space abandoned by Red Hat at the end of 2021, when the open source giant quit supporting CentOS as a downstream clone of RHEL and repurposed the brand to sit upstream of Red Hat’s flagship distro, where it essentially serves as RHEL’s nightly build. CentOS was being widely used by enterprises as a way of running RHEL without having to pay for Red Hat support, which created a need for a CentOS replacement.

RHEL 8.6 and cousins Rocky and Alma arrive

  • RHEL 8.6 and cousins Rocky and Alma arrive • The Register

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.6, Alma Linux 8.6 and Rocky Linux 8.6 are all out now, for various platforms.

    RHEL version 8.6 – codenamed "Ootpa" – arrived on May 11, and is the latest update to 2019's RHEL 8. RHEL point releases are relatively neat affairs compared to, say, Ubuntu's short-term support releases.

    8.6 is a step up from last November's RHEL 8.5. It's still based on Fedora 28 and still uses the same kernel version. In this version, you get kernel 4.18-372, which has another six months' worth of bugfixes, security updates and so on.

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