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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • New Chief Maintainer

    As I’ve said in my other email, I am resigning from my position at The Qt Company to join a small startup in Norway that is working with things unrelated to Qt.

  • Leaving The Qt Company

    Hi all,
    Let’s take the big news first. I’ve resigned from my position at The Qt Company. More on that and what it means for the Qt Project further below.

    But as I’ve spent almost exactly 25 years in the Qt ecosystem, 22 of those working for the various companies owning Qt, I hope it’s ok if this gets a bit longer and I spend some paragraphs looking back into history.
    As said, it’s been almost exactly 25 years, since I first heard about Qt. At that time, I read an article in the German C’t computer magazine about a new Desktop project for Linux called KDE. The underlying technology being used was Qt. As a person that used Linux extensively during his studies, I immediately got interested and it didn’t take long until I started my first steps learning Qt.
    As some of you might know I got involved rather deeply about a year or two later, when I started the KHTML project to create a new HTML engine for KDE in 1998/1999. That project was later forked by Apple to form the basis for their WebKit project, the Safari browser and Google’s Chrome browser. It's cool to think that the browser engine(s) that most people use today started off as a Qt based project all those years ago.
    I remember getting to know some of the people working for Trolltech back then at KDE conferences. In the winter of 2000, they invited me over to Oslo to have a look at Qt. The company was at that time still tiny with 11 or 12 employees. I got a great tour of Oslo including the ski jumping tournament at Holmenkollen and signed up for the job.
    I was originally expecting to spend 2-3 years at Trolltech and then at some point move back to Germany. As you all can see, that’s not how it went though. I ended up staying in Norway and have been working with and for Qt ever since.
    Starting with Qt 1.0, Trolltech released the source code to Qt (at that time only for Linux/Unix), and the Open Source nature of Qt played a big part in its success. I’m very happy that we could continue on that path, by over time making all platforms Qt supports available as Open Source as well as moving over to more standard and freer licensing (first GPL, later LGPL).
    At the end of the Trolltech years, we started looking into how to make it easier for the community to contribute to Qt, and first had a model where our users could submit patches to us. That never really worked very well, and I’m really happy that we moved over to our current governance model in 2011. Since then Qt has truly been an Open Source project.
    When Qt got sold by Nokia in 2012, many people considered it a dead technology. But I and many of you believed in the technology, and together we’ve managed to turn this into a great success.
    As you all know, Qt is a dual licensed technology. That Qt has the backing of a commercial business behind it, is what made the required investments possible to keep the technology competitive.
    I’m extremely proud of what we achieved with Qt over the last 10 years. It happened because everybody on this list put in a lot of work into making Qt one of the best development frameworks on this planet.
    Qt is something that I care deeply about. I’ve been with it all the way and through all the ups and downs from when Trolltech got its first larger investment to now. But seeing what you all are doing, I know it’s in very good hands moving forward.

    Leaving The Qt Company and in the future spending most of my time outside the Qt ecosystem has been a difficult decision. But in the end, after those 25 years, it does feel very much like the right decision for me. I want to try out something else.
    So I will be joining a small Norwegian startup with one of the founders of Trolltech. While still in Software, it’ll be something rather different, not related to C++ or developer tools.

  • Manifest v3 in Firefox: Recap & Next Steps | Mozilla Add-ons Community Blog

    It’s been about a year since our last update regarding Manifest v3. A lot has changed since then, not least of which has been the formation of a community group under the W3C to advance cross-browser WebExtensions (WECG).

    In our previous update, we announced that we would be supporting MV3 and mentioned Service Workers as a replacement for background pages. Since then, it became apparent that numerous use cases would be at risk if this were to proceed as is, so we went back to the drawing board. We proposed Event Pages in the WECG, which has been welcomed by the community and supported by Apple in Safari.

    Today, we’re kicking off our Developer Preview program to gather feedback on our implementation of MV3. To set the stage, we want to outline the choices we’ve made in adopting MV3 in Firefox, some of the improvements we’re most excited about, and then talk about the ways we’ve chosen to diverge from the model Chrome originally proposed.

  • Luxury Emotional Manipulation | Coder Radio 466

    Why Mike feels like Heroku is in a failed state, what drove us crazy about Google I/O this year, how Chris botched something super important, and some serious Python love sprinkled throughout.

More in Tux Machines

Proprietary Systems: Chromebooks, Windows, and Microsoft’s xClown

New GNU Releases and FSF Spring "Bulletin"

  • June GNU Spotlight with Amin Bandali: Twelve new GNU releases! [Ed: Much respect to Amin Bandali for stepping up and helping the FSF a lot when it needed it the most]
  • Spring "Bulletin": Verifying licenses, free software in education, and more!

    Software freedom needs our advocacy, our words and voices, and our generosity to spread. The biannual Free Software Foundation Bulletin is an item made for sharing, its articles from FSF staff and community members help facilitate the conversation about the importance of free software in daily life. It is a great tool to help people find their reason to support free software, to contribute to free software, or -- for the many who are just learning about it -- to take their next steps up the ladder to freedom.

pgAdmin 4 v6.11 Released

The pgAdmin Development Team is pleased to announce pgAdmin 4 version 6.11. This release of pgAdmin 4 includes 20 bug fixes and new features. For more details please see the release notes. pgAdmin is the leading Open Source graphical management tool for PostgreSQL. For more information, please see the website. Read more Also: PostgreSQL: Announcing the release of AgensGraph 2.12

today's leftovers

  • The Month in WordPress – June 2022 – WordPress News

    With WordPress 6.1 already in the works, a lot of updates happened during June. Here’s a summary to catch up on the ones you may have missed.

  • Join the LibreOffice Team as a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d), 10-20h per week, remote

    To provide high quality tools for our contributors, together working on office productivity for over 200 million users around the globe, we are searching for a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d) to start work as soon as possible.

  • Unravelling complexity in a software-defined vehicles industry | Ubuntu

    Vehicles are becoming more connected, autonomous, shared and electric (the famous CASE acronym). While customers expect new features and upgradability, the software and hardware components enabling such innovations require a different system architecture to function. This is a major change for the automotive industry as it requires new software skills, methodologies and business models. At the same time, automotive manufacturers need to adhere to complex and strict industry standards, and uphold safety-critical functions. In this post, we will focus on the different challenges the industry is facing in terms of hardware and software complexity, cybersecurity and safety. We will also discuss how Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) can learn from software companies to survive this transition towards software-defined vehicles and succeed. [...] On top of this, regulations are becoming very strict, forcing OEMs to provide patches and fixes to common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE). Taking into account the previously detailed system complexity, it is becoming increasingly necessary to move towards a software-defined holistic context. Only a software-defined approach can provide the required flexibility and scalability that allows companies to comply with regulatory requirements while providing UX updates and handling hardware complexity. Of course, cybersecurity never only relies on software. Hardware vulnerabilities can also occur and usually lead to even worse consequences. Some hardware issues can be patched via software, but usually these CVEs remain valid throughout the system’s lifetime. For example, Meltdown and Spectre, two of the most widespread hardware vulnerabilities in the world, are still present and affecting tons of devices. This means that during hardware conception, cybersecurity must be taken into account in the specifications and system architecture in order to limit these vulnerabilities.