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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • New Chief Maintainer

    As I’ve said in my other email, I am resigning from my position at The Qt Company to join a small startup in Norway that is working with things unrelated to Qt.

  • Leaving The Qt Company

    Hi all,
    Let’s take the big news first. I’ve resigned from my position at The Qt Company. More on that and what it means for the Qt Project further below.

    But as I’ve spent almost exactly 25 years in the Qt ecosystem, 22 of those working for the various companies owning Qt, I hope it’s ok if this gets a bit longer and I spend some paragraphs looking back into history.
    As said, it’s been almost exactly 25 years, since I first heard about Qt. At that time, I read an article in the German C’t computer magazine about a new Desktop project for Linux called KDE. The underlying technology being used was Qt. As a person that used Linux extensively during his studies, I immediately got interested and it didn’t take long until I started my first steps learning Qt.
    As some of you might know I got involved rather deeply about a year or two later, when I started the KHTML project to create a new HTML engine for KDE in 1998/1999. That project was later forked by Apple to form the basis for their WebKit project, the Safari browser and Google’s Chrome browser. It's cool to think that the browser engine(s) that most people use today started off as a Qt based project all those years ago.
    I remember getting to know some of the people working for Trolltech back then at KDE conferences. In the winter of 2000, they invited me over to Oslo to have a look at Qt. The company was at that time still tiny with 11 or 12 employees. I got a great tour of Oslo including the ski jumping tournament at Holmenkollen and signed up for the job.
    I was originally expecting to spend 2-3 years at Trolltech and then at some point move back to Germany. As you all can see, that’s not how it went though. I ended up staying in Norway and have been working with and for Qt ever since.
    Starting with Qt 1.0, Trolltech released the source code to Qt (at that time only for Linux/Unix), and the Open Source nature of Qt played a big part in its success. I’m very happy that we could continue on that path, by over time making all platforms Qt supports available as Open Source as well as moving over to more standard and freer licensing (first GPL, later LGPL).
    At the end of the Trolltech years, we started looking into how to make it easier for the community to contribute to Qt, and first had a model where our users could submit patches to us. That never really worked very well, and I’m really happy that we moved over to our current governance model in 2011. Since then Qt has truly been an Open Source project.
    When Qt got sold by Nokia in 2012, many people considered it a dead technology. But I and many of you believed in the technology, and together we’ve managed to turn this into a great success.
    As you all know, Qt is a dual licensed technology. That Qt has the backing of a commercial business behind it, is what made the required investments possible to keep the technology competitive.
    I’m extremely proud of what we achieved with Qt over the last 10 years. It happened because everybody on this list put in a lot of work into making Qt one of the best development frameworks on this planet.
    Qt is something that I care deeply about. I’ve been with it all the way and through all the ups and downs from when Trolltech got its first larger investment to now. But seeing what you all are doing, I know it’s in very good hands moving forward.

    Leaving The Qt Company and in the future spending most of my time outside the Qt ecosystem has been a difficult decision. But in the end, after those 25 years, it does feel very much like the right decision for me. I want to try out something else.
    So I will be joining a small Norwegian startup with one of the founders of Trolltech. While still in Software, it’ll be something rather different, not related to C++ or developer tools.

  • Manifest v3 in Firefox: Recap & Next Steps | Mozilla Add-ons Community Blog

    It’s been about a year since our last update regarding Manifest v3. A lot has changed since then, not least of which has been the formation of a community group under the W3C to advance cross-browser WebExtensions (WECG).

    In our previous update, we announced that we would be supporting MV3 and mentioned Service Workers as a replacement for background pages. Since then, it became apparent that numerous use cases would be at risk if this were to proceed as is, so we went back to the drawing board. We proposed Event Pages in the WECG, which has been welcomed by the community and supported by Apple in Safari.

    Today, we’re kicking off our Developer Preview program to gather feedback on our implementation of MV3. To set the stage, we want to outline the choices we’ve made in adopting MV3 in Firefox, some of the improvements we’re most excited about, and then talk about the ways we’ve chosen to diverge from the model Chrome originally proposed.

  • Luxury Emotional Manipulation | Coder Radio 466

    Why Mike feels like Heroku is in a failed state, what drove us crazy about Google I/O this year, how Chris botched something super important, and some serious Python love sprinkled throughout.

More in Tux Machines

Open Hardware: XON/XOFF and Raspberry Pi Pico

  • From XON/XOFF to Forward Incremental Search

    In the olden days of computing, software flow control with control codes XON and XOFF was a necessary feature that dumb terminals needed to support. When a terminal received more data than it could display, there needed to be a way for the terminal to tell the remote host to pause sending more data. The control code 19 was chosen for this. The control code 17 was chosen to tell the remote host to resume transmission of data.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico Used in Plug and Play System Monitor | Tom's Hardware

    Dmytro Panin is at it again, creating a teeny system monitor for his MacBook from scratch with help from our favorite microcontroller, the Raspberry Pi Pico. This plug-and-play system monitor (opens in new tab) lets him keep a close eye on resource usage without having to close any windows or launch any third-party programs. The device is Pico-powered and plugs right into the MacBook to function. It has a display screen that showcases a custom GUI featuring four bar graphs that update in real-time to show the performance of different components, including the CPU, GPU, memory, and SSD usage. It makes it possible to see how hard your PC is running at a glance.

Security Leftovers

How to Apply Accent Colour in Ubuntu Desktop

A step-by-step tutorial on how to apply accent colour in Ubuntu desktop (GNOME) with tips for Kubuntu and others. Read more

The Wine development release 7.15 is now available.

The Wine development release 7.15 is now available.

What's new in this release:
  - Command lists in Direct2D.
  - RSA encryption.
  - Initial Wow64 thunking in WIN32U.
  - Optional support for colors in test output.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available at:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/7.x/wine-7.15.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
Read on