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Microsoft and Other Proprietary Traps

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Microsoft

  • Microsoft moves to avert EU antitrust clash over cloud

    European cloud companies complained to the European commission, the EU's antitrust regulator, accusing Microsoft of limiting customer choice.

    They also said the user experience was made worse and that there are incompatibilities with certain other Microsoft products when not running on Azure, the company's own data operating system.

  • Microsoft cloud licensing changes in bid to head off EU anti-trust plaint

    Microsoft president Brad Smith's statement on Wednesday about the change came in the wake of a complaint filed by German software provider Next Cloud, France's OVHcloud, Italian cloud service provider Aruba and an association of cloud service providers from Denmark, Reuters reported.

    The anti-trust suit was filed in December last year against Microsoft for allegedly forcing companies to use its file-hosting service One Drive on Windows.

    A statement from NextCloud at the time said: "OneDrive is pushed wherever users deal with file storage and Teams is a default part of Windows 11," the statement said.

  • More proof that paying ransom might not save your data [iophk: Windows TCO]

    According to the report, 72% of surveyed organisations had partial or complete attacks on their backup repositories, restricting their ability to recover data without paying the ransom.

    Almost all (94%) of attackers tried to destroy backup repositories, showing their business acumen. Worryingly, though not surprisingly, 80% of successful attacks targeted known vulnerabilities.

    The majority (76%) of those attacked paid the ransom, but approximately one-third of those were unable to recover their data.

  • NATO cyber coordinators hold first-ever meeting amid Russia’s invasion [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Senior cyber coordinators from NATO held their first-ever meeting in Brussels on Wednesday to discuss the cyber threat landscape following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

    The coordinators also reviewed the progress they’ve made in cyber defense, including efforts to build resilience against cyber threats.

  • Costa Rican president says country is ‘at war’ with Conti ransomware group [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Ransomware — and particularly the Conti ransomware gang — has become a geopolitical force in Costa Rica. On Monday, the new Costa Rican president Rodrigo Chaves – who began his four-year term only ten days ago – declared that the country was ”at war” with the Conti cybercriminal gang, whose ransomware attack has disabled agencies across the government since April.

    In a forceful statement made to press on May 16th, President Chaves also said that Conti was receiving help from collaborators within the country, and called on international allies to help.

  • Australian CISOs feel ‘least prepared’, 'more at risk’ of cyber attacks compared to global counterparts: Proofpoint

    Proofpoint says that while CISOs around the world spent 2021 coming to terms with new ways of working, Australian CISOs fell behind global counterparts when it came to feeling in control of their environment, with 77% of Australian CISOs saying their organisation is unprepared to detect, deter and recover from a cyber attack – the highest in 14 countries surveyed and up 21% from 2021.

    Proofpoint’s comments come as it released its annual Voice of the CISO report, which explores key challenges facing chief information security officers (CISOs) in Australia and around the globe.

  • OAUTH2 support for GMail

    Regrettably, these kinds of fees are far beyond what I can afford, given that I rely on donations from my users to make ends meet: even the $4,500 fee is well beyond what I could find on an annual basis. Google do not mention these fees anywhere else I have seen during the development process - only when you move to the publication stage do they appear — they are a kind of "sting in the tail", as it were.

Microsoft still breaking the law

  • Microsoft seeks to dodge EU cloud computing probe with changes

    Microsoft will revise its licensing deals and make it easier for cloud service providers to compete, its president Brad Smith said on Wednesday, as the U.S. software giant sought to dodge a lengthy EU antitrust probe into its cloud computing business.

  • Independent, But Together: How Antitrust and Regulation Can Work Synergistically To Benefit Consumers [Ed: This leaves out Microsoft, but then against Public Knowledge's Board was infiltrated by a Microsoft employee]

    Today, Public Knowledge released my new paper, “A Lesson From the Landmark AT&T Breakup: Both a Sector-specific Regulator and Antitrust Enforcers Were Needed.” The paper traces how antitrust enforcers and a regulatory agency with jurisdiction over telecommunications, each working independently in pursuit of its own defined mission, produced a competitive telecommunications industry with the attendant benefits for competitors and consumers and society – lower priced and higher quality goods and services. A similar dual approach of a regulatory agency with jurisdiction over Big Tech and the vigorous application of existing and enhanced antitrust laws aimed at the industry can do the same for Big Tech.

    For the past several years, a number of macro-level public policy debates have been swirling around Big Tech. One debate has been about whether the antitrust laws, perhaps with some strengthening or new provisions specifically designed to reach Big Tech, are sufficient to address the dominance of companies such as Facebook (Meta), Google, Amazon, Apple, and some others. Indeed, whether Section 2 of the Sherman Act, antitrust’s main anti-monopolization law, can be effective for at least part of meeting this challenge is currently being tested in antitrust cases against Facebook (Meta) and Google.

Looks like entryism

  • New Public Knowledge Paper Outlines How Regulation and Antitrust Law Can Work Synergistically To Rein In Big Tech [Ed: With Microsoft employee inside Public Knowledge's Board it is now using Microsoft lobbyist talking points like "Big Tech"]

    Today, we’re happy to announce our newest white paper, “A Lesson From the Landmark AT&T Breakup: Both a Sector-specific Regulator and Antitrust Enforcers Were Needed,” by Public Knowledge Senior Fellow Al Kramer.

    The paper discusses how the work of regulators and antitrust enforcers, working independently and with separate mandates, nevertheless complemented each other, to lead to the breakup of the AT&T Bell phone monopoly in 1984—marking a win for consumers and telephone competitors alike. The paper offers a deeper understanding of the history of the breakup, providing a blueprint for how both regulation and antitrust enforcement will be necessary to develop key remedies for curbing the problems Big Tech creates for consumers and innovation today. The paper also demonstrates how antitrust and regulation in the technology sector complement each other and proposes that regulation can lay the groundwork for both more effective antitrust enforcement and the advancement of other public interest benefits.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • odcast: Why there were 56 OT vulnerabilities this week

    This week we cover the Ericsson mobility report that offers some stats on cellular IoT connections, including the surprising nugget that we won’t see 4G/5G connections surpass 2G/3G connections until some time next year. Then we hit another report. This one is from NPR and covers the state of audio and smart speakers. It proves that growth is slowing for smart speakers and that we may not do as many things with voice as we think. In dystopian news we cover China using COVID tracking apps to lock down protesters, and Microsoft stopping sales of some facial recognition tools. In new product news we talk about the latest Philips Hue gear, a new material that could generate electricity for wearables, and new MCUs from NXP. We also address the closure of SmartDry and explain how Google’s update on the Nest Max Hub may break your Nest x Yale lock. We end by answering a listener question about more accurate motion sensors.

  • Cortex XSOAR Tips & Tricks – Creating indicator relationships in automations

    In Cortex XSOAR, indicators are a key part of the platform as they visualize the Indicators Of Compromise (IOC) of a security alert in the incident to the SOC analyst and can be used in automated analysis workflows to determine the incident outcome. If you have a Cortex XSOAR Threat Intelligence Management (TIM) license, it is possible to create predefined relationships between indicators to describe how they relate to each other. This enables the SOC analyst to do a more efficient incident analysis based on the indicators associated to the incident.

  • Social Engineering Kill–Chain: Predicting, Minimizing & Disrupting Attack Verticals

    It was a Friday afternoon when Bill was on his way back home from work when he received a call that made him take the next U-turn back to his office. It was one of these calls that he was dedicating all of his working hours to avoid. He was not given much detail through the phone, but it seems that Andre, someone working in the account payments department, had just fallen victim to a scam and had proceeded to a hefty payment. A scam? Bill recalled all the training videos he had put this department through. What went wrong?

  • Daycare apps are insecure surveillance dumpster-fires

    Apps are like software, only worse.

  • 12 best patch management software and tools for 2022

    These 12 tools approach patching from different perspectives. Understanding their various approaches can help you find the right product for your needs.

Windows vs Linux: What's the best operating system?

The way you utilise your PC can often depend on the operating system you use as well as your level of technical knowledge. Even though most people will turn to macOS or Windows when deciding on an OS, if you want something you can customise, there's nothing better than Linux. Despite the fact that it isn’t as popular as Windows, Linux offers far more avenues for customisation than any other OS as it's built on an open source foundation. It's certainly more intimidating to the average user as a result, but it can be incredibly powerful, and rewarding, if you possess the skills to fully take advantage of it. Obviously, there are advantages and disadvantages with both systems that are useful to know before making the decision on which is best for you. Read more

today's howtos

  • FreeBSD Quick Guide: Audio on FreeBSD

    Whether for music, communication, or notifications, audio is an important feature of many personal computer systems. In a new FreeBSD system, an audio card will need to be configured to process audio files and send them to the connected speakers. Our newest FreeBSD quick guide will walk through setting up and configuring audio, connecting a pair of headphones (including pairing Bluetooth models), and testing the system’s sound, all in under 10 minutes!

  • Speeding up autoconf with caching - Julio Merino (jmmv.dev)

    In the recent Remembering Buildtool post, I described how setting up a cache of configuration checks was an important step in Buildtool’s installation process. The goal was to avoid pointless repetitive work on every build by performing such common checks once. Episode 457 of BSD Now featured my post and Allan Jude wondered how much time would be saved in a bulk build of all FreeBSD packages if we could just do that same kind of caching with GNU Autoconf. And, you know what? It is indeed possible to do so. I had mentioned it en passing in my post but I guess I wasn’t clear enough, so let’s elaborate!

  • How To Put Linux On A Laptop

    Linux is an operating system that comes with different distributions like Ubuntu, Debian, and Arch Linux. Just like macOS and Windows, Linux is also a popular operating system that is installed on computers and laptops to manage the hardware of the respective machine and perform the different tasks requested by the users. In this guide, different ways of installing or putting the Linux operating system on a laptop have been discussed.

  • What Is cURL Command and How to Use It (With Examples)

    This article explains the curl command in Linux and how to use it with examples based on best practices.

Raspberry Pi and Raspberry Pi Pico Projects

  • Tiny Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Robot Made For Robot Sumo | Tom's Hardware

    The Raspberry Pi in robotics is a smart mix—but what happens if the kit you ordered doesn’t support the Pi? You get creative like maker and developer WallComputer, of course! In this Raspberry Pi Zumo project, they've converted the classic Pololu Arduino Zumo kit to support the latest Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W. This tiny robot uses tank-like treads to get around, which provide the traction needed for Sumo robots designed to push each other around. Traditionally this type of robot is controlled by an Arduino Uno, but this version uses both a Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W and an STM32 microcontroller with a little help from a couple of custom PCBs. To see how much has been modified, take a look at the original product listing for the Zumo kit over at Pololu’s website. This modification was not only necessary to use the Pi, but also to add additional features like a rechargeable battery pack.

  • Best Raspberry Pi Deals 2022 | Tom's Hardware

    With more than 40 million units sold and a powerful community of makers and fans behind it, Raspberry Pi is more than a single-board computer; it's a huge platform with an even bigger ecosystem behind it. Whether you want to build your own robot, create an A.I.-powered security camera, or just set up a simple computer for programming and web surfing, the Pi is for you.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico Drives $10 Nintendo 64 Flash Cart | Tom's Hardware

    We love retro gaming on the Raspberry Pi but there’s nothing quite like retro gaming with a Raspberry Pi. Instead of running an emulator on a Pi, this Raspberry Pi Pico Nintendo 64 cart project, created by maker and developer Konrad Beckmann, is using the Raspberry Pi Pico to host a ROM that runs on the original Nintendo 64 console. I built a working Nintendo 64 flash cart with a Raspberry Pi Pico, a breakout board and some extra flash for less than $10.It boots Super Mario 64. Can't wait to optimize, improve and add more features to it!Lots of stuff left before it's ready for general users though. pic.twitter.com/C1qVaTTfHiJune 22, 2022

  • Raspberry Pi Pico Detects Gamma Rays in Open Spectroscopy Project | Tom's Hardware

    There are many useful things you can do with a Raspberry Pi Pico (opens in new tab), as our listing of the best Raspberry Pi Projects (opens in new tab) underlines. However, here’s one we admit we’d never thought of: detecting radiation. Physicist Matthias Rosezky, AKA Nuclear Phoenix (opens in new tab), whose work has also been covered by Hackaday (opens in new tab), has written up a detailed account of building a DIY gamma-ray spectrometer in IEEE Spectrum (opens in new tab).