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Fedora Family / IBM and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

  • Downstream automation is here | Packit

    As the first step on our way to Fedora users, we need to get the new upstream release to the Fedora dist-git.

  • 5 tips to prevent IT team burnout

    During the pandemic shutdown, the concept of 24/7 employee availability became normalized – especially for IT professionals, many of whom who found themselves within reach of their laptops at all times. This new normal led many IT folks to experience burnout, with stress and frustration negatively impacting the quality of their work, their personal relationships, and even their mental health.

    As a leader, you can help prevent your IT team from succumbing to burnout. Here are five tips to help ensure that your team stays happy, healthy, and productive.

  • Hybrid work: 3 technology questions CIOs should be asking [Ed: More buzzwords (about working from home and centrralised office space)]

    Hybrid work is here to stay, as workers around the globe are now insisting on that flexibility. According to a Frost & Sullivan survey of global IT decision-makers, 93 percent of business leaders expect one-quarter or more of their employees to work from home moving forward, with most likely moving between home and the office.

    As we look to assess the impact of this new way of working, CIOs need to set guidelines for what their hybrid workplace will look like and determine how they can help employees and employers navigate new workflows effectively and productively. Here are some questions to help start that process.

  • Use this open source screen reader on Windows [Ed: Red Hat promoting Microsoft Windows stuff]
  • Near zero marginal cost societies and the impact on why we work

    I have read Jeremy Rifkin's book The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism, which has a strong connection to open organization principles, particularly community building. Rifkin also writes about the future of green energy generation and energy use in logistics. This is the second of three articles in this series. In my previous article, I examined the Collaborative Commons. In this article, I look at its impact on energy production and supply.

    Within the next 25 years, Rifkin believes most of our energy for home heating, running appliances, powering businesses, driving vehicles, and operating the whole economy will be nearly free with on-site power solar, wind and geothermal energy generation. This is starting already, through both individual and micropower plants. The payback is around two to eight years.

  • Manage JMX credentials on Kubernetes with Cryostat 2.1

    Cryostat is a tool for managing JDK Flight Recorder data on Kubernetes. If you have Java Management Extensions (JMX) authentication enabled on your containerized Java Virtual Machines (JVMs), Cryostat will prompt you to enter your JMX credentials before it can access the JDK flight recordings on your target JVMs. On the Cryostat console, the Automated Rules, Recordings, and Events tabs will require you to enter your JMX credentials if you want to view existing flight recordings or perform a recording operation on a target with JMX authentication enabled. When monitoring multiple target JVMs with Cryostat features such as automatic rules, you may want Cryostat to remember and reuse your JMX credentials for each target connection.

  • Approaches to implementing multi-tenancy in SaaS applications

    The SaaS architecture checklist is a series of articles that cover the software and deployment considerations for Software as a Service (SaaS) applications. This article discusses architectural approaches for separating and isolating SaaS tenants to provide multi-tenancy, the provisioning of services to multiple clients in different organizations. For the approaches, the type and level of isolation provided are compared, along with their tradeoffs.

    The approaches laid out in different sections of the article are not mutually exclusive and can be combined to provide the levels of separation and isolation necessary to satisfy the requirements of your SaaS customers and markets. We'll also discuss how to incorporate existing single-tenant applications into a SaaS environment.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to Change Comment Color in Vim – Fix Unreadable Blue Color

    Are you annoyed about the comment color in vim? The dark blue color of the comment is often hard to read. In this tutorial, we learn how to change the comment color in Vim. There are few methods we can use to look vim comment very readable.

  • How to Add Repository to Debian

    APT checks the health of all the packages, and dependencies of the package before installing it. APT fetches packages from one or more repositories. A repository (package source) is basically a network server. The term "package" refers to an individual file with a .deb extension that contains either all or part of an application. The normal installation comes with default repositories configured, but these contain only a few packages out of an ocean of free software available. In this tutorial, we learn how to add the package repository to Debian.

  • Making a Video of a Single Window

    I recently wanted to send someone a video of a program doing some interesting things in a single X11 window. Recording the whole desktop is easy (some readers may remember my post on Aeschylus which does just that) but it will include irrelevant (and possibly unwanted) parts of the screen, leading to unnecessarily large files. I couldn't immediately find a tool which did what I wanted on OpenBSD [1] but through a combination of xwininfo, FFmpeg, and hk I was able to put together exactly what I needed in short order. Even better, I was able to easily post-process the video to shrink its file size, speed it up, and contort it to the dimension requirements of various platforms. Here's a video straight out of the little script I put together: [...]

  • Things You Can And Can’t Do

    And it got me thinking about what you can and can’t do — what you do and don’t have control over.

  • allow-new-zones in BIND 9.16 on CentOS 8 Stream under SELinux

    We run these training systems with SELinux enabled (I wouldn’t, but my colleague likes it :-), and that’s the reason I aborted the lab: I couldn’t tell students how to solve the cause other than by disabling SELinux entirely, but there wasn’t enough time for that.

  • Will the IndieWeb Ever Become Mainstream?

    This is an interesting question, thanks for asking it, Jeremy. I do have some history with the IndieWeb, and some opinions, so let’s dive in.

    The short answer to the question is a resounding no, and it all boils down to the fact that the IndieWeb is really complicated to implement, so it will only ever appeal to developers.

  • How to Install CUPS Print Server on Ubuntu 22.04

    If your business has multiple personal computers in the network which need to print, then we need a device called a print server. Print server act intermediate between PC and printers which accept print jobs from PC and send them to respective printers. CUPS is the primary mechanism in the Unix-like operating system for printing and print services. It can allow a computer to act as a Print server. In this tutorial, we learn how to set up CUPS print server on Ubuntu 22.04.

Open Hardware: XON/XOFF and Raspberry Pi Pico

  • From XON/XOFF to Forward Incremental Search

    In the olden days of computing, software flow control with control codes XON and XOFF was a necessary feature that dumb terminals needed to support. When a terminal received more data than it could display, there needed to be a way for the terminal to tell the remote host to pause sending more data. The control code 19 was chosen for this. The control code 17 was chosen to tell the remote host to resume transmission of data.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico Used in Plug and Play System Monitor | Tom's Hardware

    Dmytro Panin is at it again, creating a teeny system monitor for his MacBook from scratch with help from our favorite microcontroller, the Raspberry Pi Pico. This plug-and-play system monitor (opens in new tab) lets him keep a close eye on resource usage without having to close any windows or launch any third-party programs. The device is Pico-powered and plugs right into the MacBook to function. It has a display screen that showcases a custom GUI featuring four bar graphs that update in real-time to show the performance of different components, including the CPU, GPU, memory, and SSD usage. It makes it possible to see how hard your PC is running at a glance.

Security Leftovers

How to Apply Accent Colour in Ubuntu Desktop

A step-by-step tutorial on how to apply accent colour in Ubuntu desktop (GNOME) with tips for Kubuntu and others. Read more