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Plex Finally Has a Linux Desktop Player

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Software

Plex is one of the most popular ways to stream your own media collection, but there hasn’t been an officially-available app for playing all Plex content on Linux — until now.

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By Joey Sneddon

  • Plex Desktop App Debuts on Linux as a Snap - OMG! Ubuntu!

    Plex fans may be interested to hear that an official Plex Desktop app for Linux is now available to install from the Snap Store.

    Alongside the debut of its Linux desktop app (more on that in a second) is a ‘buttery smooth’ TV mode in Plex HTPC (pictured above) with a powerful playback engine and a UI that scales up to 10 feet.

    In a blog post the company describes this addition to Plex HTPC as “…the true spiritual successor to [Plex Media Player] TV mode,” referencing its much-loved (but old) ‘Plex Meda Player’ tool some users weren’t keen to move on from.

    Designed for the big-screen, Plex HTPC includes a compliment of features centred around a home theatre setup, including remote controller/gamepad support, input mapping, refresh rate switching, multi-channel audio, and more.

    It’s easy to forget how ubiquitous “local” home theatre set-ups were prior to the ‘on demand streaming’ era. In a world where most of what we watch or listen to is hosted on “cloud” servers (and thus readily available across devices) the need for dedicated PC-based setups like Plex feels narrower — but it’s clearly not non-existent.

"also now available for Linux."

  • Plex HTPC turns your TV-connected PC into a media center (again) - Liliputing

    Plex has actually been releasing test builds of its HTPC app for a little over a year, but the software now appears to be out of beta. The new Plex HTPC app is also now available for Linux (previous builds had been Mac and Windows only), and the Plex desktop app (which doesn’t have a TV-sized interface) is also now available for Linux. Right now the Linux apps are only available as Snap packages, but Plex is also working on Flatpak builds which should allow them to be installed on more GNU/Linux distributions.

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