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Ubuntu: Firefox Snaps, Lubuntu Kinetic Kudu 22.10 Artwork Contest, Cephalocon

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Ubuntu
  • How are we improving Firefox snap performance? Part 1 | Ubuntu

    Ubuntu Desktop aims to deliver an open source operating system, available to everyone that just works for whatever they need. With Ubuntu 22.04 LTS, we believe we’ve come closer than ever to achieving that goal. However, as always, there are still a number of areas we want to improve to deliver the highest quality user experience. One of those areas is our default browser, Firefox, which transitioned to being distributed as a snap with Ubuntu 21.10.

    To understand this decision, I want to focus on the ‘just works’ part of my opening statement. The Firefox snap offers a number of benefits to daily users of Ubuntu as well as a range of other Linux distributions. It improves security, delivers cross-release compatibility and shortens the time for improvements from Mozilla to get into the hands of users.

    Currently, that decision has trade-offs when it comes to performance, most notably in Firefox’s first launch after a system reboot. A part of this is due to the inherent nature of sandboxing, however we feel there is still significant opportunity to improve start-up times across the board. We want to share the results of some of those investigations today, as well as highlight some recent meaningful changes in this area

    This is an ongoing journey, and this blog article will be the first in a series as we update you on our progress.

    Ultimately, the real test will be how you, the user, experience these updates as they land. At the end of this post, we’ve put together some tools to help you keep track of the snap performance on your own machines. If you still have questions you can also join us tomorrow for our monthly Ubuntu Desktop Team Indaba, where this topic will be our main focus.

  • Lubuntu Kinetic Kudu 22.10 Artwork Contest – Lubuntu

    The Lubuntu Team is pleased to announce we are running a Kinetic Kudu artwork competition, giving you, our community, the chance to submit, and get your favorite wallpapers for both the desktop and the greeter/login screen (SDDM) included in the Lubuntu 22.10 release.

  • Charmed Ceph and Hybrid Clouds at Cephalocon 2022

    In just a few weeks Cephalocon will be held in Portland at the Oregon Convention Center, as well as online for those unable to travel. After a pandemic induced hiatus, this will be the first gathering of Ceph developers and users in 3 years.

    Among the attendees, you will be able to meet the Canonical team, and be able to discuss the benefits of using Charmed Ceph for all of your storage needs, in private clouds, stand-alone, and cloud-adjacent settings.

Canonical Details Plans to Make the Firefox Snap, Snappier

  • Canonical Details Plans to Make the Firefox Snap, Snappier

    I think most of us can agree that the Firefox Snap included in Ubuntu 22.04 LTS doesn’t start up nearly as fast as it could (or arguably should).

    Now, Canonical wants us to know that — and it wants us know that it’s doing something to fix it.

    Canonical’s Oliver Smith runs through the current causes of slow cold startup times in a blog post, and details some of the steps its engineers are taking to improve the situation. Oliver also spends a bit of time setting out the stall for why Firefox is now a Snap app in Ubuntu, and why, overall, a Snap is inherently better for most of us using Ubuntu.

    Oliver explains that the “[Firefox Snap has] trade-offs when it comes to performance, most notably in Firefox’s first launch after a system reboot. A part of this is due to the inherent nature of sandboxing, however we feel there is still significant opportunity to improve start-up times across the board.”

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