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Recent experience with Ubuntu 7.04 Vs Suse 10.2 Vs PCLOS 2007

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Linux

I'm using PCLOS since 6 months and it was the first distro that I tried recently. I had my first experience with the Linux in 1998, I had installed PCQ Linux and tried Suse that time. My experience with Suse was not at all good that time because it messed my partition and I had to struggle to get back things normal for few days. Since than I was on Windows, about 6 months back when I got pissed of Windows for its bugs,viruses and bloted environment with the slow performance I gave a thought to linux and when I thought about Linux it reminds me the past but still I thought lets try if things are changed.

I searched on the web and found top three distros Ubuntu,Suse and PCLOS. while surfing screenshots of the different OSs I like PCLOS .93 and it made me to download and install PCLOS. I was surprised how beautiful the linux is now compare to past. Not only the beauty it was flying on my old laptop with 256MB ram, it recognised everything and I got everything out-of-the-box.

Recently when the PCLOS site was down, it scared me that how would I get help and new things if it the PCLOS shutsdown one day!!! it made me to look around for other distros. As you can smell the other distro which was attracting me was Ubuntu and Suse. I didnt download for a while and at the same time PCLOS website was up and TR4 was about to release. I was happy about the PCLOS return but I was still abit scared, so I thought lets try Ubuntu 7.04 and Suse 10.2, and if they are good and can beat PCLOS than I would install them. I'm sure you guys will not believe what is coming up in next few paragraphs.

First I've created live CD of Ubuntu 7.04, and for SUSE I have option of either creating Live DVD or installation DVD (What a crap, cant they make one DVD for both), so I had created Installation DVD (because I had only one DVD).

More Here.



Me too

My experiences led me to the same conclusion as anantgowerdhan. 'buntu and SuSE users don't realise what they are missing and what they are tolerating needlessly.

Agreed

Totally agreed that Ubuntu sucks and the users who haven't used any other distro except Ubuntu are missing many things. Although, I myself am completely happy with openSUSE, but now I think that it is time to try PCLOS as well.

OpenSUSE

I like the the look and feel of OpenSUSE a lot. They have some good kde coders and I love their kde patches. They have a complete control center and you can do almost everything graphically which is a big plus for any commercial distro.

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