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PCLinuxOS Preview 9.1 updated and released.

PCLinuxOS Preview 9.1 is now posted up on the bittorrent tracker located at http://www.pclinuxonline.com/tracker. This is an update for the livecd with fixes for various issues found after the release of preview 9. A new 2.6.11-oci12 kernel was added, xorg updated and the PCLOS Control Center got an update to fix some configuration utilities. We added a new kdeusb disk key setup for using the guest account on a usbkey disk. The installer now checks to make sure you have enough space on the primary partition to do a complete install. The livecd received a full update from synaptic (80 plus rpms) to bring it up to date. In addition we tweaked the boot up process removing some services that caused a problem with some nforce mobos and removed some serial drivers that were causing a delay in the boot process. If you have already installed preview 8, 81a or 9 and are fully updated from Synaptic, you do not need to do a clean install of preview 9.1.

* Changelog from Preview 9 to 9.1

Updated to kernel 2.6.11-oci12
Updated to 2.6.11.12 mainline kernel patch
Synced with 2.6.11-ck10 patchset
Enabled tape and parallel ide/scsi support
Enabled Memory Technology Devices (MTD) support
Enabled PCI Hotplug Support
added iburst-1.1 (new wireless modem driver)

Turned off cpufreq, powernow at boot
Turn on pcmcia at boot.

unionsfs enabled by default
(Can be disabled at boot if desired by typing livecd unionfs=no)

Removed noapic and nolapic from iso boot and hd installer.
(Can be added to command line if needed by typing livecd noapic nolapic)

Added nforce kernel drivers
Added madwifi kernel drivers
Added firmware for Gigafast WF741-UIC USB WLan
Added Kdenlive, Amule and Logjam
Fixed Mozilla Firefox Crash on 2nd run
Fixed bittorrent gui
Fixed firmware for ipw2100 and ipw2200

Fixed printing on most multi-function printers
(Espon stylus printers still a problem)

Fixed modprobe.preload to not load bogus serial drivers.
(Cut 15-25 seconds off of boot time depending on cpu speed)

Did apt-get update and installed all updated rpms 80 plus packages
(nvu 1.0, gimp 2.2.8, k3b. 0.12.2, etc)

Added new kdeusb for usbkey setup for guest account (need to test)
Updated livecd-install to check for main partition less that 2.5 gig.
Updated sources list file for apt
Added safeboot option to livecd
Fix loading of sg kernel driver at boot

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I really like your packages, distro, and tutorials

Texstar, I've come across your tutorials, software packages, and your excellent PCLinuxOS many times. I'm not sure if I first saw your work associated with a Mandrake based system or a Lycoris based system, but I'm pretty sure I've seen the "Texstar" packages in both places at one time or another.

I once worked with Joseph Cheek as his primary product support specialist at Lycoris. I wish him well as he consults for Mandriva, and I also wish you well as you continue to develop PCLinuxOS, write great tutorials, and generally add to the usefulness of desktop Linux software.

--
Brian Masinick
masinick .AT yahoo .DOT com

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Moving (parts of) the Cling REPL in Clang

Motivation
===

Over the last decade we have developed an interactive, interpretative 
C++ (aka REPL) as part of the high-energy physics (HEP) data analysis 
project -- ROOT [1-2]. We invested a significant  effort to replace the 
CINT C++ interpreter with a newly implemented REPL based on llvm -- 
cling [3]. The cling infrastructure is a core component of the data 
analysis framework of ROOT and runs in production for approximately 5 
years.

Cling is also  a standalone tool, which has a growing community outside 
of our field. Cling’s user community includes users in finance, biology 
and in a few companies with proprietary software. For example, there is 
a xeus-cling jupyter kernel [4]. One of the major challenges we face to 
foster that community is  our cling-related patches in llvm and clang 
forks. The benefits of using the LLVM community standards for code 
reviews, release cycles and integration has been mentioned a number of 
times by our "external" users.

Last year we were awarded an NSF grant to improve cling's sustainability 
and make it a standalone tool. We thank the LLVM Foundation Board for 
supporting us with a non-binding letter of collaboration which was 
essential for getting this grant.


Background
===

Cling is a C++ interpreter built on top of clang and llvm. In a 
nutshell, it uses clang's incremental compilation facilities to process 
code chunk-by-chunk by assuming an ever-growing translation unit [5]. 
Then code is lowered into llvm IR and run by the llvm jit. Cling has 
implemented some language "extensions" such as execution statements on 
the global scope and error recovery. Cling is in the core of HEP -- it 
is heavily used during data analysis of exabytes of particle physics 
data coming from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other particle 
physics experiments.


Plans
===

The project foresees three main directions -- move parts of cling 
upstream along with the clang and llvm features that enable them; extend 
and generalize the language interoperability layer around cling; and 
extend and generalize the OpenCL/CUDA support in cling. We are at the 
early stages of the project and this email intends to be an RFC for the 
first part -- upstreaming parts of cling. Please do share your thoughts 
on the rest, too.


Moving Parts of Cling Upstream
---

Over the years we have slowly moved some patches upstream. However we 
still have around 100 patches in the clang fork. Most of them are in the 
context of extending the incremental compilation support for clang. The 
incremental compilation poses some challenges in the clang 
infrastructure. For example, we need to tune CodeGen to work with 
multiple llvm::Module instances, and finalize per each 
end-of-translation unit (we have multiple of them). Other changes 
include small adjustments in the FileManager's caching mechanism, and 
bug fixes in the SourceManager (code which can be reached mostly from 
within our setup). One conclusion we can draw from our research is that 
the clang infrastructure fits amazingly well to something which was not 
its main use case. The grand total of our diffs against clang-9 is: `62 
files changed, 1294 insertions(+), 231 deletions(-)`. Cling is currently 
being upgraded from llvm-5 to llvm-9.

A major weakness of cling's infrastructure is that it does not work with 
the clang Action infrastructure due to the lack of an 
IncrementalAction.  A possible way forward would be to implement a 
clang::IncrementalAction as a starting point. This way we should be able 
to reduce the amount of setup necessary to use the incremental 
infrastructure in clang. However, this will be a bit of a testing 
challenge -- cling lives downstream and some of the new code may be 
impossible to pick straight away and use. Building a mainline example 
tool such as clang-repl which gives us a way to test that incremental 
case or repurpose the already existing clang-interpreter may  be able to 
address the issue. The major risk of the task is avoiding code in the 
clang mainline which is untested by its HEP production environment.
There are several other types of patches to the ROOT fork of Clang, 
including ones  in the context of performance,towards  C++ modules 
support (D41416), and storage (does not have a patch yet but has an open 
projects entry and somebody working on it). These patches can be 
considered in parallel independently on the rest.

Extend and Generalize the Language Interoperability Layer Around Cling
---

HEP has extensive experience with on-demand python interoperability 
using cppyy[6], which is built around the type information provided by 
cling. Unlike tools with custom parsers such as swig and sip and tools 
built on top of C-APIs such as boost.python and pybind11, cling can 
provide information about memory management patterns (eg refcounting) 
and instantiate templates on the fly.We feel that functionality may not 
be of general interest to the llvm community but we will prepare another 
RFC and send it here later on to gather feedback.


Extend and Generalize the OpenCL/CUDA Support in Cling
---

Cling can incrementally compile CUDA code [7-8] allowing easier set up 
and enabling some interesting use cases. There are a number of planned 
improvements including talking to HIP [9] and SYCL to support more 
hardware architectures.



The primary focus of our work is to upstreaming functionality required 
to build an incremental compiler and rework cling build against vanilla 
clang and llvm. The last two points are to give the scope of the work 
which we will be doing the next 2-3 years. We will send here RFCs for 
both of them to trigger technical discussion if there is interest in 
pursuing this direction.


Collaboration
===

Open source development nowadays relies on reviewers. LLVM is no 
different and we will probably disturb a good number of people in the 
community ;)We would like to invite anybody interested in joining our 
incremental C++ activities to our open every second week calls. 
Announcements will be done via google group: compiler-research-announce 
(https://groups.google.com/g/compiler-research-announce).



Many thanks!


David & Vassil

Read more Also: Cling C++ Interpreter Looking To Upstream More Code Into LLVM

This week in KDE: New features galore!

Tons and tons of awesome new features and UI polish landed this week, alongside an equally weighty ton of important bugfixes. Read more