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PCLinuxOS Preview 9.1 updated and released.

PCLinuxOS Preview 9.1 is now posted up on the bittorrent tracker located at http://www.pclinuxonline.com/tracker. This is an update for the livecd with fixes for various issues found after the release of preview 9. A new 2.6.11-oci12 kernel was added, xorg updated and the PCLOS Control Center got an update to fix some configuration utilities. We added a new kdeusb disk key setup for using the guest account on a usbkey disk. The installer now checks to make sure you have enough space on the primary partition to do a complete install. The livecd received a full update from synaptic (80 plus rpms) to bring it up to date. In addition we tweaked the boot up process removing some services that caused a problem with some nforce mobos and removed some serial drivers that were causing a delay in the boot process. If you have already installed preview 8, 81a or 9 and are fully updated from Synaptic, you do not need to do a clean install of preview 9.1.

* Changelog from Preview 9 to 9.1

Updated to kernel 2.6.11-oci12
Updated to 2.6.11.12 mainline kernel patch
Synced with 2.6.11-ck10 patchset
Enabled tape and parallel ide/scsi support
Enabled Memory Technology Devices (MTD) support
Enabled PCI Hotplug Support
added iburst-1.1 (new wireless modem driver)

Turned off cpufreq, powernow at boot
Turn on pcmcia at boot.

unionsfs enabled by default
(Can be disabled at boot if desired by typing livecd unionfs=no)

Removed noapic and nolapic from iso boot and hd installer.
(Can be added to command line if needed by typing livecd noapic nolapic)

Added nforce kernel drivers
Added madwifi kernel drivers
Added firmware for Gigafast WF741-UIC USB WLan
Added Kdenlive, Amule and Logjam
Fixed Mozilla Firefox Crash on 2nd run
Fixed bittorrent gui
Fixed firmware for ipw2100 and ipw2200

Fixed printing on most multi-function printers
(Espon stylus printers still a problem)

Fixed modprobe.preload to not load bogus serial drivers.
(Cut 15-25 seconds off of boot time depending on cpu speed)

Did apt-get update and installed all updated rpms 80 plus packages
(nvu 1.0, gimp 2.2.8, k3b. 0.12.2, etc)

Added new kdeusb for usbkey setup for guest account (need to test)
Updated livecd-install to check for main partition less that 2.5 gig.
Updated sources list file for apt
Added safeboot option to livecd
Fix loading of sg kernel driver at boot

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I really like your packages, distro, and tutorials

Texstar, I've come across your tutorials, software packages, and your excellent PCLinuxOS many times. I'm not sure if I first saw your work associated with a Mandrake based system or a Lycoris based system, but I'm pretty sure I've seen the "Texstar" packages in both places at one time or another.

I once worked with Joseph Cheek as his primary product support specialist at Lycoris. I wish him well as he consults for Mandriva, and I also wish you well as you continue to develop PCLinuxOS, write great tutorials, and generally add to the usefulness of desktop Linux software.

--
Brian Masinick
masinick .AT yahoo .DOT com

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