Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Making a dual-boot RH9 and Fedora Core 3 computer

Filed under
HowTos

Making a dual-boot RH9 and Fedora Core 3 computer
TGodfrey 07-07-05

There are many different ways to configure dual booting Linux and Windows on a computer. There are very few documented methods in configuring a dual booting Linux setup. This write-up (although not perfect), should give the basis of getting Red Hat 9 and Fedora Core 3 working on the same hard drive.

The machine I used is a standard IBM PIII-600, 128mb RAM, with roughly 40gb of hard drive space. It’s a great machine which I’ve had for many flawless years and is about as solid as a mid-1950’s Buick.

My plan is to divide it in half for this installation. I booted from the RH9 CD, configured Disk Druid accordingly:

/boot    ext3    100mb
/        ext3    15000mb (15gb)
       swap    520mb

…then loaded the box in a workstation configuration. The install ran through the three CD’s and rebooted afterward. Other items were finalized when it came back and the installation looked good. I then accessed TERMINAL, changed to /etc, and copied the existing grub.conf file to grub.rh9_1 to make a backup copy. Put Fedora CD#1 in the drive and then do an ‘init 6’ for the reboot.

You will want to do a new installation, not an upgrade to the RH9 system. I decided to do the partitioning very similar as before. When it got to putting together the grub file, I selected it to write a new one. The rest of the install went very well and I rebooted afterwards.

The machine came back and only the Fedora part was in the newly written grub file just like I told it to do. Great….now where is the RH9 install I did earlier? Since the computer was running, it was decided to access TERMINAL, change to /etc, and copy the existing grub.conf to grub.fed_1 since I like working with a safety net. I rebooted with the original RH9 CD, fixed the grub for RH9 to boot, and then rebooted yet again.

I figured all I have to do is update the RH9-made grub with a few lines from the Fedora-made grub and all will be well. This was true and all works very well. Listed below are the steps I did and the final grub.conf file:

1. Go to TERMINAL
2. Type: cd /mnt [ENTER]
3. Type: mkdir Fedora [ENTER]
4. * When I configured the Fedora installation, it saw the ‘/’ as hda5 So….type: mount /dev/hda5 /mnt/Fedora [ENTER]
5. Type: cd /mnt/Fedora [ENTER], then an ‘ls’ to list files
6. Type: cd /etc [ENTER], then type: cat grub.fed_1 [ENTER]
To display the contents of the file
7. Open another TERMINAL
8. Type: cd /etc, then type: vi grub.conf [ENTER]
9. Add the Fedora lines where you would like and how you would like. Make sure the save the file when you are done. My grub.conf file looks like:

default=0
timeout=10
splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
title RH Linux 9 (2.4.20-6)
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.20-6 ro
    root=LABEL=/ hdc=ide-scsi
    initrd /initrd-2.4.20-6.img
title Fedora Core 3 (2.6.9-1)
    root (hd0,4)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.9-1.667 ro
    root=LABEL=/12 rhgb quiet
    initrd /boot/initrd-2.6.9-1.667.img

I am sure there is probably a simpler way of getting the same results, but the entire exercise took about 45 minutes and it was kind of fun to do. Hopefully, you can glean what you need from this without doing the extra install of RH9. Just make sure the kernel version and hard drive setup match what you have. It works well and I now have a working knowledge of doing a dual boot Linux setup.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more