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Nine easy steps to installing Skype for Kubuntu Linux

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HowTos

A friend of mine, who is trying to rid his life of Microsoft Windows, has set himself the task of learning Linux.

I say ‘task’ because, for all it might be easy for those of us who’ve followed Linux’s evolution from a while back to think of something like installing a pre-compiled binary as fairly simple, to the uninitiated - things like adding repositories to the apt-get list - can sometimes be a minefield of in-speak readme files and esoteric, sleep inducing frustrating procedures - which even the self-confessed nerd can find obtuse and off-putting.

Here, then, is a walk through which, by example, uses Skype - the popular voice over IP client - but is a procedure by which most application installs follow, assuming there is a pre-built binary of the program you want to use available from the author(s).
Unlike Windows or Mac, you don’t necessarily have to go to the web-site of the software you want to install to download the application you want. In most cases you can find what you’re looking for by using what can simply be referred to as Linux’s “own” software pool, which is accessed by opening a program called Adept - which comes pre-installed with all current versions of Ubuntu and Kubuntu Linux - the most user friendly versions of Linux to date.

More Here.



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