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Canonical Releases Ubuntu Core 22 for IoT, Edge and Embedded Devices

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Ubuntu Core 22 comes as a fully containerized variant of Ubuntu 22.04 LTS (Jammy Jellyfish) introducing a fully preemptible kernel to ensure time-bound responses and enable advanced real-time features out of the box on Ubuntu Certified Hardware from Canonical's partners.

New features include remodeling capabilities to allow users to change device IDs so that they can be rebranded, remodeled, or assigned to a different Snap Store, support for validation sets to help users ensure that only specific Snaps are installed and that they stay at fixed revisions, the ability to factory reset devices, and MAAS (Metal as a Service) support.

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Canonical Ubuntu Core 22 is now available – optimised for IoT

  • Canonical Ubuntu Core 22 is now available – optimised for IoT and embedded devices

    Canonical today announced that Ubuntu Core 22, the fully containerised Ubuntu 22.04 LTS variant optimised for IoT and edge devices, is now generally available for download from ubuntu.com/download/iot. Combined with Canonical’s technology offer, this release brings Ubuntu’s comprehensive and industry-leading operating system (OS) and services to a complete range of embedded and IoT devices.

    IoT manufacturers face complex challenges to deploy devices on time and within budget. Ensuring security and remote management at scale is also taxing as device fleets expand. Ubuntu Core 22 helps manufacturers meet these challenges with an ultra-secure, resilient, and low-touch OS, backed by a growing ecosystem of silicon and ODM partners.

What you’re missing out if you don’t try Ubuntu Core 22

  • What you’re missing out if you don’t try Ubuntu Core 22

    Ubuntu Core, the Ubuntu flavour optimised for IoT and edge devices, has a new version available. With a 2-year release cadence, every new release is both an exciting and challenging milestone.

    Ubuntu Core is based on Ubuntu. It is open source, long-term supported (LTS), binary compatible and offers a unified developer experience. It allows developers and makers to build composable and software-defined appliances built from immutable snap container images. The goal is to offer developers a new development experience, getting away from complex cross-compilation frameworks and intricate system layers Application development is the focus with simple tools that can be used across all Ubuntu flavours.

Master IoT software updates with validation sets on Ubuntu Core

  • Master IoT software updates with validation sets on Ubuntu Core 22

    If you are packaging your IoT applications as snaps or containers, you are aware of the benefits of bundling an application with its dependencies. Publishing snaps across different operating system versions and even distributions is much easier than maintaining package dependencies. Automated IoT software updates make managing fleets of devices more efficient. While you can avoid the dependency hell between software packages, how could you ensure that the diverse applications on an IoT device work well together?

    Ubuntu Core 22 introduces the feature of validation sets that makes IoT device management easier. A validation set is a secure policy (assertion) that is signed by your brand and distributed by your dedicated Snap Store. With validation sets you can specify which snaps are required, permitted or forbidden to be installed together on a device. Optionally, specific snap revisions can be set too.

Sean Michael Kerner

  • Ubuntu Core 22 brings real-time Linux options to IoT | VentureBeat

    Embedded and internet of things (IoT) devices are a growing category of computing, and with that growth has come expanded needs for security and manageability.

    One way to help secure embedded and IoT deployments is with a secured operating system, such as Canonical’s Ubuntu Core. The Ubuntu Core provides an optimized version of the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system for smaller device footprints, using an approach that puts applications into containers. On June 15, Ubuntu Core 22 became generally available, providing users with new capabilities to help accelerate performance and lock down security.

    Ubuntu Core 22 is based on the Ubuntu 22.04 Linux operating system, which is Canonical’s flagship Linux distribution that’s made available for cloud, server and desktop users. Rather than being a general purpose OS, Ubuntu Core makes use of the open-source Snap container technology that was originally developed by Canonical to run applications. With Snaps, an organization can configure which applications should run in a specific IoT or embedded device and lock down the applications for security. Snaps provide a cryptographically authenticated approach for application updates.

Ubuntu Core 22 Released for IoT and Embedded Device Makers

  • Ubuntu Core 22 Released for IoT and Embedded Device Makers - OMG! Ubuntu!

    A new version of Ubuntu Core is available to download.

    For those unaware, of it Ubuntu Core is Canonical’s streamlined Ubuntu spin targeted at embedded devices, IoT, and other industrial hardware. It is a containerised version of regular Ubuntu boasting a small footprint, super-secure design, and support for transactional software updates using Snaps.

    Ubuntu Core 22 is the latest release and as you may be able to tell from its version number it’s based on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS. It is backed by 10 years of security maintenance of kernel, OS and application-level code updates from Canonical.

Canonical updates Ubuntu Core...

  • Canonical updates Ubuntu Core with support for real-time compute in robotics and industrial apps - SiliconANGLE

    The Ubuntu developer Canonical Ltd. today announced general availability of a new edition of Ubuntu Core, its fully containerized operating system for edge and “internet of things” devices.

    With the update, the operating system now supports real-time compute in robotics and industrial applications, the company said. Ubuntu Core is an OS that’s designed for low-powered devices. It’s incredibly lightweight, secure and resilient, the company claims, and it’s backed by a growing ecosystem of silicon and original design manufacturer partners.

    The key characteristic of Ubuntu Core is that it’s fully containerized, with its main components – including the kernel, operating system and applications — all broken down into packages known as “snaps.” Each of these snaps operates within an isolated sandbox that includes the app’s dependencies, ensuring it’s both portable and resilient.

  • Ubuntu Core 22: The secure, application-centric IoT OS is now available - Help Net Security

    IoT manufacturers face complex challenges to deploy devices on time and within budget. Ensuring security and remote management at scale is also taxing as device fleets expand. Ubuntu Core 22 helps manufacturers meet these challenges with an ultra-secure, resilient, and low-touch OS, backed by a growing ecosystem of silicon and ODM partners.

    “Our goal at Canonical is to provide secure, reliable open source everywhere – from the development environment to the cloud, down to the edge and to devices,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical. “With this release, and Ubuntu’s real-time kernel, we are ready to expand the benefits of Ubuntu Core across the entire embedded world.”

  • New Electronics - Canonical Ubuntu Core 22 optimised for IoT and embedded devices

    The release brings Ubuntu’s comprehensive operating system (OS) and services to a complete range of embedded and IoT devices.
    IoT manufacturers face complex challenges when it comes to deploying devices, while ensuring security and remote management at scale is also becoming increasingly challenging as device fleets expand. Ubuntu Core 22 has been developed to help manufacturers by providing an ultra-secure, resilient, and low-touch OS, backed by a growing ecosystem of silicon and ODM partners.

    “Our goal at Canonical is to provide secure, reliable open source everywhere - from the development environment to the cloud, down to the edge and to devices,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical. “With this release, and Ubuntu’s real-time kernel, we are ready to expand the benefits of Ubuntu Core across the entire embedded world.”

    The Ubuntu 22.04 LTS real-time kernel, now available in beta, delivers high performance, ultra-low latency and workload predictability for time-sensitive applications.

  • Ubuntu Core 22 supports real-time compute for robotics

    Canonical today announced that Ubuntu Core 22, the fully containerized Ubuntu 22.04 LTS variant optimized for IoT and edge devices, is now generally available for download. This release brings Ubuntu’s operating system (OS) and services to a complete range of embedded and IoT devices.

    “Our goal at Canonical is to provide secure, reliable open source everywhere – from the development environment to the cloud, down to the edge and to devices,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical. “With this release, and Ubuntu’s real-time kernel, we are ready to expand the benefits of Ubuntu Core across the entire embedded world.”

  • IoT Focused Ubuntu Core 22 Available Now | Tom's Hardware

    Edge and IoT device developers have another weapon in their arsenal of operating systems following the announcement today of the latest version of Ubuntu Core. The operating system is Canonical’s latest fully containerized Linux distro for embedded systems, robotss, Raspberry Pi (opens in new tab) boards and other smart applications.

Ubuntu Core 22 Release Addresses Challenges of IoT, Edge...

  • Ubuntu Core 22 Release Addresses Challenges of IoT, Edge Computing | LinuxInsider

    Canonical is pushing the security and usability conveniences of managing internet of things (IoT) and edge devices with its June 15 release of Ubuntu Core 22, the fully containerized Ubuntu 22.04 LTS variant optimized for IoT and edge devices.

    Combined with Canonical’s technology offer, this release brings Ubuntu’s operating system and services to a complete range of embedded and IoT devices. The new release includes a fully preemptible kernel to ensure time-bound responses. Canonical partners with silicon and hardware manufacturers to enable advanced real-time features out of the box on Ubuntu Certified Hardware.

    “Our goal at Canonical is to provide secure, reliable open-source everywhere — from the development environment to the cloud, down to the edge and to devices,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical. “With this release and Ubuntu’s real-time kernel, we are ready to expand the benefits of Ubuntu Core across the entire embedded world.”

    One of the important things about Ubuntu Core is that it is effectively Ubuntu. It is fully containerized. All the applications, kernel, and operating system are strictly confined snaps.

Ubuntu Core brings real-time processing to Linux IoT

  • Ubuntu Core brings real-time processing to Linux IoT

    Most of you know Ubuntu as a desktop operating system; others know it as an outstanding server Linux or as a tremendously popular cloud OS. But Canonical, Ubuntu's parent company, is also a serious player in the Internet of Things (IoT) arena. And with its latest IoT release, Ubuntu Core 22, Canonical brings real-time processing to the table.

Canonical releases Ubuntu Core 22 designed for IoT and embedded

  • Canonical releases Ubuntu Core 22 designed for IoT and embedded devices - Neowin

    Canonical has announced the release of Ubuntu Core 22, a version of Ubuntu 22.04 LTS that is fully containerised and designed for IoT and embedded devices. If you have some use cases for Ubuntu Core 22, you can download it now.

    On Ubuntu Core, all of the software is containerised – this is a fancy way of saying everything comes as a snap package. This allows seamless over-the-air updates of the kernel, operating system, and applications. By using snaps, apps won’t run into any dependency issues as they are all packaged with the software. If anything goes wrong with an update, the system will automatically roll back to the previous working version.

    Canonical describes Ubuntu Core 22 as low touch because it comes with enhanced security measures out of the box. These measures include secure boot, full disk encryption, secure recovery, and strict confinement of the OS and apps. Canonical delivers 10 years of updates for Ubuntu Core 22 so once you have it in place you won’t need to mess with it for a while.

Ubuntu Core 22 released for IoT devices and embedded systems

  • Ubuntu Core 22 released for IoT devices and embedded systems

    Canonical has just released Ubuntu Core 22, a containerized variant of Ubuntu 22.04 LTS, optimized for IoT devices and embedded systems and supporting Ubuntu’s new real-time kernel.

    In Ubuntu Core, everything is a snap, including the kernel, OS, and applications both to improve security to sandbox each package and to enable updates of specific packages from the IoT App Store over-the-air (OTA). If something goes wrong during the update, the system will automatically roll back to the previous version, so the device cannot be bricked. The Snap system also minimizes network traffic through delta updates.

Ubuntu Core 22 is Here for IoT and Edge Devices

  • Ubuntu Core 22 is Here for IoT and Edge Devices

    Ubuntu Core 22 is a containerized Ubuntu 22.04 LTS variant optimized for embedded and IoT devices.

    It should be a wonderful offering for developers looking to make use of Canonical’s latest operating system for edge devices.

The Stack

  • Ubuntu Core 22 goes GA: Thanks for the... Internet of Shrimp?

    Canonicals’ open source operating system (OS) for edge and Internet of Things devices, Ubuntu Core 22 , is now generally available as the company eyes market opportunities for the fully containerised OS at the heart of a growing ecosystem of embedded industrial, telecommunications, automotive and robotics devices.

Ubuntu releases Core 22: Its IoT and edge distro

  • Ubuntu releases Core 22: Its IoT and edge distro • The Register

    Canonical's Linux distro for edge devices and the Internet of Things, Ubuntu Core 22, is out.

    This is the fourth release of Ubuntu Core, and as you might guess from the version number, it's based on the current Long Term Support release of Ubuntu, version 22.04.

    Ubuntu Core is quite a different product from normal Ubuntu, even the text-only Ubuntu Server. Core has no conventional package manager, just Snap, and the OS itself is built from Snap packages. Snap installations and updates are transactional: this means that either they succeed completely, or the OS automatically rolls them back, leaving no trace except an entry in a log file.

    Combined with Core's read-only root filesystem, the idea is that the operating system is always in a known-good state, and should be able to quickly and reliably recover from a power outage or a failed package installation, without the risk of disk corruption. As such, the OS can safely update itself, and is configured to do this automatically as soon as you start it. Finally, as shipped, you can only access Core over SSH: you can't log in on its console.

Ubuntu Core 22 wants to power the next generation of IoT devices

  • Ubuntu Core 22 wants to power the next generation of IoT devices | TechRadar

    Canonical, the company behind top Linux distro Ubuntu, has announced a new variant of the open source operating system, optimized for IoT and edge devices.

    Dubbed Ubuntu Core 22, the new operating system is pitched as helping manufacturers meet the challenges of ensuring security and remote management at scale as IoT ecosystems grow larger and more complex.

    Ubuntu has already powered some pretty colourful IoT use cases including Xiaomi’s recently released robotic canine, CyberDog.

Storage news ticker – June 21

  • Storage news ticker – June 21 – Blocks and Files

    Canonical’s Ubuntu Core 22, the fully containerized Ubuntu 22.04 LTS variant optimized for IoT and edge devices, is now generally available for download. The release includes a fully pre-emptible kernel to ensure time-bound responses. The Ubuntu 22.04 LTS real-time kernel, now available in beta, delivers high performance, ultra-low latency, and workload predictability for time-sensitive industrial, telco, automotive, and robotics use cases, Canonical said.

Ubuntu Core 22 Brings Real-time Compute Support for IoT...

  • Ubuntu Core 22 Brings Real-time Compute Support for IoT Industrial Applications

    The latest version of Canonical OS for IoT and embedded systems, Ubuntu Core 22, introduces real-time support for applications in robotics and industry.
    With a 10y LTS and a special focus on security, Ubuntu Core is a containerized version of Canonical Linux-based OS specifically crafted for IoT devices and embedded systems.
    Ubuntu Core leverage containerization to enforce a clean separation the kernel, OS image and applications. Additionally, it supports "on the air updates" to make it easier for customers to update their app in a transactional way and reducing network traffic by only transmitting diffs. Devices running Ubuntu Core can also have their dedicated IoT App Store which allows to control which apps can be installed.

Canonical Ubuntu Core 22 is now available

IoT Focused Ubuntu Core 22 Available Now

  • IoT Focused Ubuntu Core 22 Available Now

    Edge and IoT device developers have another weapon in their arsenal of operating systems following the announcement today of the latest version of Ubuntu Core. The operating system is Canonical’s latest fully containerized Linux distro for embedded systems, robots

ITPro

  • Ubuntu Core 22 is now generally available for IoT and edge devices

    Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, has announced a new version of Ubuntu Core for Internet of Things (IoT) and edge devices.

    The fully containerized Ubuntu Core 22 variant, aligned with Ubuntu 22.04 long-term support (LTS) through 2023, offers a new embedded operating system paradigm that is inherently reliable and secure, stated Canonical in a blog post.

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