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Buying an Ubuntu Dell

Dell? Yes! - Ubuntu?Maybe?!

Although I agree with what kwr2k says I think I will ( sooner or later this year) buy Dell laptop and not a desktop system Since I use to build my desktop machines but laptops...hmmm, haven't even tried make one yet! Wink
I don't think Ubuntu will surive on that laptop if all hardware that comes with it is supported in
VectorLinux 5.8 or PCLinuxOS or SAM Linux. OpenSUSE 10.2 would be also nice to see on laptop machine
but I'm not carying around my laptops ( Compaq Presario XL 1200/PCLinuxOS and old Compaq Armada/SAM Linux ) to impress my friends or any other people but to get the job done.But time has come to retire my old laptops with which I did numerous test runs with I-don't-know-how-many-distros,and please myself with a brand new Dell laptop.

Ubuntu, no way

I'd love to buy it if it had openSUSE pre installed.
Ubuntu is SO over hyped.

No motivation

First reason is Dell ... second is Ubuntu and I don't know in what order to put them as de-motivators. Reason is, I am happy with HP at the moment (2 laptops) and more importantly, my distribution - PCLinuxOS - is far better than ubuntu in all areas.

Yes, I have tried Ubuntu as well as Kubuntu's past 3 releases on both the laptops. I wonder if Michael Dell really gave PCLinuxOS a try on his personal machine??

Future purchase...

Well I just arranged to buy a laptop (thanks again!), but the next thing I'll need to do is upgrade my desktop. The value system looks like a good deal and the fact that it's $200 less that the same computer running Windows makes it even more attractive. I usually stay away from Dells for political reasons, but I think supporting desktop linux is more important in this case. btw is Dell doing the tech support or Canonical?

Ubuntu + Dell

I just purchased one of the first Dell’s pre-installed with Ubuntu Linux. I had several motives for doing so. The first, and primary, reason for the new computer was that my current work PC here at home has been giving me numerous hardware issues causing the computer to freeze up several times per day. I have been debating about getting a new computer for several months now but decided to wait until Dell officially started selling Ubuntu PC’s to make a decision.

The second reason was that I wanted to show my support monetarily for the decision by Dell to pre-install Ubuntu. It also doesn’t hurt that Ubuntu has been my distribution of choice since 5.04 (Hoary Hedgehog). I really think this has the potential to be a big deal for all of Linux (not just Ubuntu) if it is done right and if the response is significant enough.

Full Post.

re: Ubuntu + Dell

the article wrote:

"all for $1048 (with $350 off coupon)"

WITH the coupon, it's not a bad price. You could assemble a slightly better spec'd system for $900 - using way better non-propriety components and install whatever Open Source OS you prefer. All with a longer manufacture warranty, and the ability to upgrade the components at will without worrying about compatibility.

I think it's going to take much larger coupons to tempt people to give them a try, and even if the hardware is reasonably priced it's yet to be seen how their support will play out (of course how hard is it to say "insert your linux system restore disk into your optical drive"?)

Just say noooooo

I wouldn't buy a Dell even if .... well I can't think of anything that would make me buy a Dell.

Worse support ever (and that's after being suckered into buying their premium "gold support" for enterprise services).

We switched to IBM a few years back and haven't regretted it once.

Dell

A good thing!
I prefer an ubuntu machine vs a windows machine!!
It means .deb driver packages for my dell

Slackware Dell

I said no but maybe I will, just for the diference in price. Then I'll install Slackware on it Wink

No moneys :(

Well to me I am happy to stick with my HP laptop, very nice hardware manuals accompanying it mean I will be upgrading my processor and hardrive before the year is out probably quadrupling the performance of my machine.
If the worst happened to my system(s) (lightning followed by flood) I would probably just build a system myself anyways.

I am not the target audience I think, I am willing to pay for OSS software, but for hardware I want the most powerful box for the cheapest price so I would have to see the specs before I buy a pre-built one.

I LOVE the way that Dell is offering an alternative and I think if M$ slapped them on the wrist they would probably start an anti-M$ craze rather then yield to the Behemoth. (Well I can dream)

It would be nice to see these on the shop floor really competing with Vista, until someone has Vista shown next to a machine with all the Compiz GUIness people will probably still go with M$.

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