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The KDE 3.5 Control Center - Part 9 - Sound & Multimedia

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The Sound & Multimedia section covers four basic areas of the KDE multimedia system that are important to your daily use of KDE from a multimedia perspective. As much as we may or may not realize it, we rely on a lot of multimedia interaction with our computers every day. Be it music, video or something else, it's all very important to us and without it, our experience wouldn't be the same. So lets look at each of the four subsections in this section and how each one is important to your daily user experience.

Audio CD's

The Audio CDs subsection is designed, oddly enough, with the soul intent to provide you with a very easy to use CD ripping and encoding interface directly through KDE. The only catch to this is, depending on what linux or bsd distribution you have, you will likely be required to install several related packages first that aren't installed by default by KDE or your Linux/BSD distribution. This is mostly because of licensing concerns. Some will still install them for you, so you'll need to consult with the provider of your distribution to find out for certain. Typically you'll need to install XMCD, libogg (for ogg encoding), lame (for mp3 encoding), and flac to get this functionality working. If you don't need any of this, then you can skip installing these and/or using this section and move onto the next. If you plan to rip any cd's, then keep reading.

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