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The Terminator -- "ps" and "kill"

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Software

What can you do when processes wear out their welcome and stick around longer than you would like them to? This article introduces the commands ps and kill. Combined, they are the Arnold Schwarzenegger equivalent among the Linux / Unix commands. Learn how you can use them to clean out any process that ignores your request to close up and go away...

Even on Linux it sometimes happens that processes wear out their welcome and stick around longer than you would like them to. They simply ignore your request to close up and go away. Fortunately you have a powerful gun at your disposal that will clean out anything that doesn't get a hint: The Arnold Schwarzenegger equivalent among the Linux commands is the kill command.

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On your system, it is perfectly possible that you might have more than one version of a particular application installed. If you’ve custom compiled an application or have concurrent versions of one bit of software, this might be an issue for you.

Now when a program is in your PATH (in one directory of a list of special directories on your system), you can execute it just by typing its name and not the full path (e.g. ls and not /bin/ls).

But what happens when you’ve got two programs in PATH directories called the same thing?

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