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Showing the Newbie's Side in Linux

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Linux

When I first started reading the article "Current Problems with Linux" I expected something of a Linux bashing. However as I read thru it, I kinda remembering feeling the way he describes five years ago when I first started using Linux. It took me about 3 or 4 tries to finally get away from windows due to some of the issues Aditya Nag discusses. I don't entirely agree with all his assessments, but some merit further thought.

He states, "If there is one thing that people hate, it's being condescended to. Unfortunately, this was a common occurrence on many Linux message boards and help resources. People saying things like "READ THE MANUAL, YOU MORON" usually doesn't send the positive message to the learner."

That kind of response was more prevailant back when I started than it is now. Take a stroll thru the gentoo forums sometime. Most regulars are so helpful they get complimented on it often. I recall a nice community of helpful users surrounding Mandrake hanging out in the alt.os.linux.mandrake newsgroup back when I used it. I imagine we all can list example after example of others helping others for no other reason than just to help.

Nag continues to describe 7 or 8 areas in which he feels Linux might be improved to help newcomers and become more accepted. Worth a read, especially if you've forgotten what it was like to be a newbie.

Full story.

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