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Motherboard Review Roundup—Socket 939

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Hardware
Reviews

Socket 939 is no longer a rare commodity in mainboards like it was six months ago. We've batched together a group of nine of these AMD Athlon 64–ready mobos, ranging from the bargain basement to the ultimate gamer models for overclockers and tweakers.

Here's an at-a-glance comparison of the boards, with links to the reviews.

Product Review date Price at review time Check prices Summary

MSI RS480M2-IL

04/11/2005 $95

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A great, inexpensive board for quiet Media Center PCs or small casual-computing desktops. Performance-minded enthusiasts need not apply.

Soltek SL-K890Pro-939

05/02/2005 $109

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For under $100, this gives you plenty of capacity and good performance.

ASUS A8V-E Deluxe

(WiFi)

05/04/2005 $140

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Built-in WiFi notwithstanding, there’s no good reason to choose this motherboard.

ECS nForce4-A939

04/05/2005 $89

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For the price, this is a really good board. Those looking for something more feature-packed would be better off spending a little more.

DFI LanParty UT nF4 Ultra-D

04/18/2005 $135

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For the overclockers out there, this is an awesome board at a very reasonable price. ExtremeTech Approved

ABIT Fatal1ty AN8

03/16/2005 $195

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Delivers the best benchmarks we've yet seen for an Athlon 64 motherboard, but the funky slot layout might be a problem, and our failure to overclock is discouraging.

EPoX 9NPA+ Ultra

04/13/2005 $128

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This is a great nForce 4 Ultra based board, well-suited for tweakers and overclockers. ExtremeTech Approved

ECS: KN1 Extreme

05/11/2005 $120

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Not all KN1 Extreme boards may have the stability problems we’ve seen, but they are worrisome. That, plus a lack of BIOS features, is enough for us to tell you to steer clear.

Foxconn WinFast NF4UK8AA

03/21/2005 $109 N/A This is a great value for those who don't plan to overclock and don't need access to all 4 SATA connectors with a large graphics card.

Full Article.

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