Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Fedora 7 Release Adds Installable KDE Live CD

Filed under
Linux

The Fedora Project has announced the immediate availability of their latest release, Fedora 7 (Moonshine) including, for the first time, a KDE live CD/DVD showcasing KDE and KDE applications, which can also be installed to the hard disk, resulting in a regular Fedora installation with KDE. Along with other current software, Fedora 7 includes KDE 3.5.6. Unfortunately, KDE 3.5.7 was released too late to be included in Fedora 7, however it will be made available as an update. The 32-bit version fits on a 700 MB CD, the 64-bit version needs DVD or special overlong CD media for space reasons. KDE is also included on the traditional installer DVD. KDE in Fedora 7 defaults to the default KDE look and feel, with Plastik as the widget theme and CrystalSVG as the icon theme.

Full Story.


Red Hat users have long been able to select the packages they want to install on their systems. The latest Fedora release improves that customization and puts Red Hat squarely in the face of custom Linux appliance builders, such as rPath, that have recently begun to challenge Red Hat's dominance in the Linux market.

Fedora 7, released today, allows users to build their own custom versions of Red Hat's community Linux offering using tools Red Hat is open sourcing.

Customize Your New Red Hat Fedora



On May 31, Red Hat's sponsored and community supported open source Fedora Project released the latest version of its distribution: Fedora 7. Besides being a cutting edge Linux distribution, it features a new build capability that enables users to create their own custom distributions.

Fedora 7 now boasts a completely open-source build process that greatly simplifies the creation of appliances and distributions that can be targeted to meet individual needs.

Highly flexible Fedora 7 Linux arrives


Well, Fedora 7 was fun. Now we get to think about Fedora 8.

FIRST: we're going to start tracking release dates for Fedora much more aggressively. The current goal: release Fedora twice a year, at Halloween and May Day, every year. Which means a short release cycle this time 'round, so we basically have zero time to hang out and enjoy it too much. Preliminary release schedule is here (although the wiki is superslow right now, so you may want to wait a day or two to check it out).

SECOND:

Fedora 8

Proposed Fedora 8 Release Schedule.

Cool beans

Well that makes me a happy camper. Can't wait to test drive Fedora 7 KDE edition. I love their announcemnet. Too funny!

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Meaning of Convergence, Exploit Excludes Linux

The big news yesterday and even into today was the new Ubuntu tablet, which everyone including Canonical touted as "convergence delivered." Well, today Randall Ross scolds news sites for missing the "timely idea" that is convergence. In other news, security researchers have identified a new exploit that specifically avoids Linux. FOSS Force found that Linux users have no interest in anti-virus software and Phoronix reports on Ubuntu performance over the years. Read more

Tor Browser 5.5.1 Brings a Functional Private Anonymous Browser to Chinese Users

The Tor Project announced today, February 5, 2016, the immediate availability for download of the first point release for the Tor Browser 5.5 anonymous web browser for Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows platforms. Read more

Ubuntu Linux in the Wild: How a French University Uses Unity

Is Canonical's Unity interface for Ubuntu Linux ready for use by the masses? Arguably, no. But the administration of the Ecole normale supérieure (ENS) in Paris apparently likes Unity well enough to deploy it throughout the university's library. The ENS is one of France's "grandes écoles," or elite universities. It also happens to have one of the only open-stack academic libraries in Paris, which is what brought me there this week. I was surprised upon entering to find that the workstations throughout the library now run Ubuntu (which was not the case when I was last there, circa early 2012). Here's proof: Read more

The trials of certifying open source software

Open source won and, over the past five years or so, we have been seeing the acceleration of a new wave of open source projects that got their starts in corporations. This comes with a set of new challenges, as new corporate participants struggle with some of the realities. Folks generally understand that foundations provide neutrality in some form, but don't necessarily know how to drive the competitive discussions from the room. One of the more disturbing symptoms of this confusion is the discussions beginning around "certification" and what it means to be certified to a particular project. What is Certified Good SoftwareTM? [1] Read more