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FCC approves second UWB chip set

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Technology developer General Atomics said Friday (July 8) that its spectral keying ultrawideband (UWB) radio technology has been certified by the Federal Communications Commission.

San Diego-based General Atomics said the FCC approval means its customers will be able to integrate its UWB chip set into wireless radio systems.

Spectral keying UWB allows the combining of impulse radio architectures with multiple, independent frequency bands. The company claims the capability permits radios to operate without interference in high multipath environments.

The company and development partner TDK RF Solutions (Austin, Texas) said they have demonstrated error-free streaming video up to 15 meters through walls. The spectral keying chip set integrates an UWB transceiver with RF, baseband and proprietary media access control functions. The chip set targets streaming media and USB applications, General Atomics said.

General Atomics is the second UWB developer to receive FCC certification for its chip set. Freescale Semiconductor received FCC certification in March 2004 for commercialization of its XS110 chip set for direct-sequence UWB applications.


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