Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Catching Up With JOST

Filed under
Software

Three months ago I introduced my readers to a new system for hosting VST plugins compiled natively for Linux. That system has continued its development and has become a mainstay in the Studio Dave Linux audio arsenal. Here's an update on the system's recent incarnations, complete with the usual multimedia extravaganza of text, screenshots, and sounds.

Lucio Asnaghi's JOST continues its progress towards a first-rate sound creation suite. Recently I've been employing the 0.2.3 stable version in my MIDI production system under the JAD Linux distribution (openSUSE 10.2), and I've been very pleased with its performance.

Cannibal's Trance (OGG 7MB) is a simple trance piece, an original I wrote as a texture study over a bass part reminiscent of the riff from Land Of A Thousand Dances in the version recorded by a group named Cannibal & The Headhunters. My piece is simple enough indeed, but its setup was not: I needed four instances of JOST, three channels in QSynth, some additional processing in JACK-Rack, and MIDI channel routing via midirgui. Figure 1 shows off this happy band at work.

Full Story.



More in Tux Machines

Today and Yesterday in Techrights

Wine 1.9.9

Six free open source alternatives to Windows 10: Chrome, Ubuntu, Solus and more, what's the best alternative to Windows OS?

Windows 10 has generally be viewed as a welcome successor to Windows 8, both by businesses and individuals. However it has also come under scrutiny from users that are concerned about data privacy. So why not opt for a free Windows 10 alternative? Read more

Yet another GTK+ update

GTK+ 3.20 was released a while ago; we’re up to 3.20.3 now. As I tried to explain in earlier posts here and here, this was a pretty active development cycle for GTK+. We landed a lot of of new stuff, and many things have changed. I’m using the neutral term changed here for a reason. How you view changes depends a lot on your perspective. Us, who implemented the changes, are of course convinced that they are great improvements. Others who maintain GTK+ themes or applications may have a different take, since changes often imply that they have to do work to adapt. Read more