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Build a Secure Web Server with Mandriva 2005 LE

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In this build, like the last one, we are going to gear our server towards dynamic content. That doesn't mean that static sites can't be run from this server. We'll once again build a LAMP (Linux Apache MySql Php) driven site. Since things like blogging and PHP-Nuke are so popular this server will be just the ticket. Imagine not having to pay hosting fees for your site anymore. It's a great thing!! This build is even more secure then the last one, and it was pretty tight.

We'll start by obtaining the Official Media which is "Mandriva Limited Edition 2005". There are updated versions for the club members that contain updated versions of some softwares but none of those will be used here. The updates pertain to desktop apps. Besides we want to stick with the officially supported software from Mandriva. It will receive all patches and security updates whereas the club versions will not.

Let's insert the first CD and configure the BIOS to boot from the CD-Rom. We are going to cover the Differences from the Workstation build only. So the first difference is the security level. When you get to this screen be sure to pick "Paranoid". This will set us up a "Chain-Rooted" configuration. What does that mean??? Well it will secure certain directories and also include a whole host of security checks to keep our server up to snuff on the security side of things. It also shuts down all ports and installs Shorewall firewall. Of course we'll tighten it down even further!! Here is the Screenshot.

Our next page of concern after Security is the "Partitioning" screen. The only word I have here is that Mandriva puts the Sql data and the Web root in the /var directory so be sure to make the /var directory large enough to handle your sites along with their respective databases. You can experiment with the partitioning tool and configure it just the way you like. I make my /var directory anywhere from 4-15 Gig depending on how many and how complex the websites are that the machine will be serving. To put things into perspective....LinuxLoader is now just over 1 year old and its at about 250Mb including its database. For our example build I made the /var about 10G. Since /home really won't contain much data, make it small. Here is our example server.

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