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Microsoft Gives Xandros Linux Users Patent Protection

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Microsoft

Redmond has signed a set of broad collaboration agreements with Linux provider Xandros that include an intellectual property assurance.

Microsoft, shrugging off licensing moves to prevent it from repeating its controversial patent deal with Novell, has signed a set of broad collaboration agreements with Linux provider Xandros that include an intellectual property assurance under which Microsoft will provide patent covenants for Xandros customers.

These covenants, which are almost identical to the patent agreement and covenant not to sue that Microsoft signed with Novell last November, will ensure that the Xandros Linux technologies customers use are compliant with Microsoft's IP, David Kaefer, Microsoft's General Manager for IP and Licensing, told eWeek

The collaboration agreements between Microsoft and Xandros, which are valid for five-years and will be announced June 4, also cover a set of technical, business and marketing commitments designed to give customers enhanced interoperability and more effective systems management solutions, he said.

Under the agreement, Microsoft and Xandros will focus on five primary areas over the next five years: systems management interoperability, server interoperability, office document compatibility, sales and marketing support, and IP assurance.

Full Story. Apparently pulled. Here's a Mary Jo Foley post about it:

Did Xandros sign a Novell-like patent deal with Microsoft?



Bad link?

Either the link is wrong, or the link has been moved or the story has been pulled by eWeek.

re: Bad Link?

Dang, they pulled it. I guess they jumped the gun. Here's a Mary Jo Foley blog about it:

Did Xandros sign a Novell-like patent deal with Microsoft?

Susan, thanks for grabbing lumps of the text.

This proves to have been useful, whether it's true or not. I was unable to find it elsewhere, but Technorati brought this one up.

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