Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Who's Afraid of Google? The New Evil Empire

Filed under
Google

One of the more significant non-events just happened – Google’s lukewarm embrace of Salesforce.com – and there’s a lot of speculation about what Google in the enterprise software market would mean. So let’s talk about what Google is really up to first: A clearer understanding of Google’s role in the overall economy will shed some light on what an alliance with Salesforce.com, or any other enterprise software vendor, would mean.

Let’s start by calling Google for what it is: a publishing company that makes money from advertising, one that is so successful that it is slowly sucking the life out of the mainstream publishing business, and along with it the profession of journalism and the role of the fourth estate in modern society.

And let’s also start by calling Google for what it isn’t: a company that will make an impact in the enterprise software space any time soon, deals with the likes of Salesforce.com notwithstanding.

Based on what it’s been able to accomplish to date, I deem this company to be the new evil empire – this from a company whose informal motto is “Don’t be Evil.” Google’s evil is more threatening than anything the original evil empire, Microsoft, has ever succeeded in doing, and in that regard Google has already topped its rival, even if it still hasn’t really made a dent in Microsoft’s core business with its free, on-demand software.

Full Story.



More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

Ubuntu 16.04 Review: What’s New for Desktop Users

Ubuntu is a tricky distribution. As much as I love it on my home server, my desktop is a different ballgame. In my experience, releases between LTS versions have many new technologies that may or may not survive in the next LTS. There were many technologies or features that Canonical thought were ambitious -- HUD, experimenting with menus, online dash search, Ubuntu Software Center, etc. -- but they were abandoned. So, if I were to use Ubuntu on my desktop, I would still choose LTS. Read more

Workflow and efficiency geek talks Drush and Drupal

I started using Drupal because I needed an open source content management system (CMS) to use in several community projects. One of the projects I was involved with was just getting started and had narrowed its CMS selection down to either Drupal or Joomla. At the time I was using a different framework, but I had considered Drupal in the past and knew that I liked it a lot better than Joomla. I convinced them to go with the new Drupal 6 release and converted all of my other projects for consistency. I started working with Drush because I wanted a unified mechanism to work with local and remote sites. My first major contribution to Drush was site aliases and sql-sync in Drush 3. Read more