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Is the Linux development model flawed?

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Linux

Back in the early 1990s, when Linux initiator Linus Torwalds and open source software started to make headlines, the idea of giving software away seemed crazy. Looking at the headway the movement has made since then, you might be forgiven for wondering why Linux desktops have failed to become as ubiquitous as Linux servers are.

Oh, how they laughed when the open source movement started. But today, Linux is present in almost every enterprise and, according to market researcher IDC, it's set to keep on growing. In fact, Linux server sales have hit their second consecutive quarter of double-digit growth and constitute 12.7 percent of the overall server market, or $1.6 billion for the first quarter of 2007, reckons the research company.

What's more, server technology has moved forward in leaps and bounds, with virtualisation - now the accepted way of helping to combat the combined treats of humungous and expensive power consumption and adding to the global climate crisis - only the latest technology to make it into the Linux kernel.

So there are millions of Linux boxes out there, performing tasks such as serving Web pages and hosting databases. And there's a fair number of Linux machines running as desktops, mainly for technically savvy enthusiasts and computer professionals.

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Some people never change.

I know that writer and he consistently bashes Linux. In fact, he even seems to have angered the people at Dell (Linux offering). I suggest that you don't link to his articles because over time he has made it clear that he dislikes Linux as a matter of priciple. While citing positive statements from analysts, he completely contrasts them. I don't know who pays this man...

re: Some People

I read the article - what part do you have a problem with?

He makes several valid points, and doesn't seem to go out of his way to bash anything.

If Linux wants to compete in the Enterprise, it has to do so on it's own merits, not from all the FUD coming from BOTH camps.

Not just this one...

It is not just this one article that triggers the red light. I have read quite a few of them (I syndicate that site and he's just one among seevral writers). I can't give you examples off hand/head, but I can assure you that there is evidence to support a suspicion.

People often defend things for a variety of reason, which blinds and impedes objective judgment. Some of these are financial. All I say is that this article, given its source, should be taken with a barrel of salt. People resist change.

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