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Over 16 Small Games For Ubuntu Linux

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Gaming

Ubuntu Linux is one of the most popular Linux distribution , it is especially popular among Linux newbies and windows refuges . Now Ubuntu Linux does come with a descent set of applications , still there is a scope for including some more quality applications and especially games . Now in this tutorial i will show you how to install a large number of small , easy and less resource hungry games on Ubuntu Linux with screen-shots of games .

1. Rocks 'n' Diamonds

Rocks 'n' Diamonds is a Boulderd*sh game for X11 with more than just the falling rocks and diamonds of its namesake. The object is still to collect all the diamonds (and emeralds), then get to the exit before time runs out. But your character must make use of bombs, spaceships, and many other elements in order to fill his quota of jewels.

2. Globulation 2

Globulation 2 is an innovative Real-Time Strategy (RTS) game which reduces micro-management by automatically assigning tasks to units. Globulation 2 brings a new type of gameplay to RTS games. The player chooses the number of units to assign to various tasks, and the units do their best to satisfy the requests. This allows players to manage more units and focus on strategy rather than individual unit's jobs. Globulation 2 also features AI allowing single-player games or any possible combination of human-computer teams.

3. Pysol

4. Super Tux

Full Story.




Wow. I must get this Ubuntu

Wow. I must get this Ubuntu so I can run all 16 of these games.

Insert_Ending_Here

Impressive

Wow I didn't know there were so many corny games for Linux, Now I can sell my PS3. Wow Ubuntu you have really gone beyond yourself offering the same games nearly every Linux distribution does. That has to be tuff. Definitely deserves a download, some time, well.... If I have the room.. Looks like I don't. The 200G of blank space is to important for me to use. Nevermind.

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