Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Cybercrooks lure citizens into international crime

Filed under
Misc

To Karl, a 38-year-old former cabdriver hoping for a career in real estate sales, the help-wanted ad radiated hope.

The ad sought "correspondence managers" willing to receive parcels at home, then reship them overseas. The pay: $24 a package.

Karl applied at kflogistics.biz, a fraudulent Web site imitating a legitimate site.

He quickly received an e-mail notifying him he had landed the job, followed by instructions on how to take receipt of digital cameras and laptop computers, affix new labels and "reship" the items overseas. Easy enough.

Within weeks, he had sent off six packages, including digital cameras and computer parts, to various addresses in Russia. Little did Karl know he had become an unwitting recruit in a growing scheme to assist online criminals, the latest wrinkle in digital fraud that costs businesses hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

Before long, Karl began to feel like Sydney Bristow from the TV show Alias, who wrangles her way through dealings with the Eastern European underworld. (Fearing possible retaliation, Karl asked that his real name not be used for this article.)

One day, a $4,358 electronic deposit appeared out of nowhere in Karl's online bank account, followed by e-mail instructions to keep a small amount as pay and wire the rest to Moscow. Then he began receiving account statements intended for online banking customers from across the USA. Someone had changed the billing addresses for stolen credit cards and bank account numbers to his residence in Grass Valley.

One of the letters was intended for 28-year-old Ryan Sesker of Des Moines, letting him know that his credit limit had been raised to $5,000 — a request he never made. Around the same time, a USA TODAY investigation found, someone accessed Sesker's online banking account and extracted $4,300.

"I thought I could work a few hours a day and make a couple hundred bucks, not get sucked into something out of Alias," Karl said later, sipping a cup of steamed milk in a sleepy cafe.

What Karl had become, in fact, was a "mule."

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • SMPlayer 17.1 Features ‘Experimental Support’ for Chromecast
  • Support for Chromecast in SMPlayer 17.1
    SMPlayer 17.1 features experimental support for Chromecast. Now you can send videos from SMPlayer to your Chromecast device, including local files from your computer and online streams such as TV channels or videos from sites like YouTube, Dailymotion, Vimeo, Vevo and many more.
  • How Node.js Is Transforming Today’s Enterprises
    On today’s episode of The New Stack Makers, we sat down with NodeSource Solutions Architect Manager Joe Doyle and NodeSource Chief Technology Officer and co-founder Dan Shaw to hear more about how today’s enterprises are approaching working with Node.js. The interview was recorded at Node.js Interactive 2016, which took place in Austin, December 2016.
  • 4 Configuration Management Tools for DevOps
    In the past, maintaining technology infrastructure, deploying applications, and provisioning environments involved many manual, iterative tasks. But in today’s DevOps arena, true automation of these tasks has arrived. The benefits of automated configuration management range from time savings to elimination of human error. Meanwhile, configuration management platforms and tools have converged directly with the world of open source. In fact, several of the very best tools are fully free and open source. From server orchestration to securely delivering high-availability applications, open source tools ranging from Chef to Puppet can bring organizations enormous efficiency boosts.
  • GPMDP Is A Feature-Packed Google Play Music Desktop Application
    The application is built using Electron, so it's a wrapper for the Google Play Music web interface, with various desktop features added on top, like media keys support, tray/indicator and much more.
  • Netdata 1.5 Released With FreeBSD Support, New Plugins
    Netdata, for the uninitiated, is a distributed real-time performance and health monitoring suite. Netdata can be used for monitoring server performance/health as well as VMs, IoT devices, and more in a "fast and efficient" manner. Netdata 1.5 has been released as a big update to this open-source tool.
  • Firefox Gets Better Video Gaming and Warns of Non-Secure Websites
    Today’s release of Firefox includes various features for developers and users that enable a richer and safer experience on the web.

Leftovers: Gaming

Red Hat News