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M$ Patent Deal - Who's Next?

Mandriva
40% (291 votes)
Red Hat
10% (74 votes)
Ubuntu
13% (97 votes)
Knoppix
2% (11 votes)
Mepis
4% (27 votes)
Gentoo
1% (8 votes)
Slackware
1% (8 votes)
PCLOS
7% (53 votes)
No one
21% (150 votes)
Total votes: 719

Re: Ubuntu forces you to add Microsoft codecs on your own time.

There is not no need for adding the MS win32codecs.
Xine ( without the win32codecs ) can play all formats proprietary and free apart from real media.
If you want real media support, you can always download the realplayer for Linux from realnetworks.

I think that the following

I think that the following are imposible to have a deal with M$:

Red Hat(they have already said no)
Ubuntu(the community is huge, that Ubuntu is 99.9% based in community)
Slackware(too old xD)

more on patents

How about - Oracle Unbreakable Linux?

//just kidding!

My votes on Mandriva, since there really is no sense going after non-commercial distro's

my vote went to mandriva as

my vote went to mandriva as well, there'd be no sense in going after something like knoppix or slack, which in my opinion is the best distro of all time, mandriva would prolly be the next to be attacked

Patents.

It is obvious that Slackware, Ubuntu , PCLinuxOS and Gentoo will never do this. In fact even MS will not agree to make a agreement with those distribution.

Redhat won't do this because of "principle" reasons.

Only big commercial distributions like Mandriva are likely to make an agreement with MS.

re: Patents.

Yep, I agree. Red Hat would never sign. Gentoo is almost a "specialty" system with a niche userbase... I don't think they'd be asked. Slackware might be asked, but I'm not sure they are "commercial" enough. But then on the other hand, Microsoft might need a Slackware or Debian to validate their claims - which will never happen. PCLOS is too small and not commercial - they'd never be asked. Mepis is a candidate, and hmmm, they'd might be tempted. I think Mandriva is the most likely candidate. Commercial and struggling financially and at one time, top of the game. And I bet if they were offered a big payday, they'd take it too.

EDIT: SJVN seems to think it will be Ubuntu, for some valid reasons. He just might be right. So, as of his story breaking, Mandriva stands at 33 and Ubuntu has 9. Let's see if his article turns the tide.

The microsoft way

This like to be the microsoft way to open source: to pay so Linux can use ms software without problem.
The ms quality in Linux?

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