Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

After Intel suit, Fujitsu Siemens launches AMD machines

Filed under
Hardware

Microprocessors from Advanced Micro Devices Inc. (AMD) are once again taking a prominent place in PCs manufactured by Fujitsu Siemens Computers GmbH, the companies announced Tuesday.

Fujitsu-Siemens launched the Esprimo E small form-factor PC and Esprimo P tower in the second quarter, but only with Intel Corp. processors. Now the German PC maker is taking orders for Esprimo E and P models with AMD processors, and will ship them at the end of the month to customers in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, according to Fujitsu-Siemens spokeswoman Sabine Twest.

The launch of the new models comes just two weeks after AMD accused Intel of using its influence with PC manufacturers to shut AMD out of the market.

In a lawsuit filed June 28 in the U.S., AMD wrote that its chips once powered over 30 percent of Fujitsu-Siemens' consumer PCs, but that in early 2003, "Intel offered Fujitsu-Siemens a 'special discount' on Celeron processors which Fujitsu-Siemens accepted in exchange for hiding its AMD computers on its website and removing all references to commercial AMD-powered products in the company's retail catalog."

As of Tuesday, however, PCs with AMD processors had top billing on the front page of the Fujitsu-Siemens Web site.

The timing of the launch is unconnected with AMD's lawsuit, according to Twest, who pointed to AMD's plans to announce its quarterly results on Wednesday as a more likely trigger for the announcement. "Our new product development with AMD is a long process," she said.

The Esprimo E is priced from €749 (US$904) with an AMD processor, or from €849 with an Intel chip, Fujitsu-Siemens said. Esprimo P models with AMD processors begin at €599, it said. Fujitsu-Siemens quotes reference prices for Germany, including value-added tax (VAT).

The company has no plans to offer AMD processors in its Esprimo C ultra-small desktop range, as there is not the same level of demand for it as for the Esprimo E and P, which are "huge volume products," Twest said.

The Esprimo E desktop models contain a 3.5-inch drive bay which can be used for a second hard disk, a wireless LAN module, a smart card reader or a memory card reader. Two rear panel configurations are available, one with slots for two full-height PCI cards and one low-profile PCI Express x16 card, and the other with slots for four low-profile cards. They have two USB (Universal Serial Bus) ports and an audio connector on the front panel.

The existing Esprimo E5905 ships with Intel's Pentium 4 processor or Pentium D dual-core processor and its 945G Express chipset, while the new Esprimo E5600 will ship with an AMD Athlon 64 or Sempron processor and the SiS761 chipset.
Both AMD and Intel models have a quiet cooling system that Fujitsu-Siemens says produces just 24dB of noise even under high processor load.

The Esprimo P has a similar specification, but in a minitower case and without the choice of back panels.

By Peter Sayer
IDG News Service

More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Linux Security Automation at Scale in the Cloud
    Ten years ago it didn’t seem like Linux growth could increase any faster. Then, in 2006, Amazon launched Amazon Web Services (AWS). Linux growth went from linear to exponential. AWS competitors sprang up and were acquired by IBM, Microsoft, and other big players, accelerating Linux expansion even more. Linux became the platform of choice for the private cloud. But this movement wasn’t confined to the cloud. A rush to create Linux applications and services spilled over to traditional on premises. Linux had evolved from that obscure thing people ran web servers on to the backbone operating system of the majority of IT.
  • Don’t want to get hacked? Close your laptop.
    My friends often leave their computers open and unlocked. I tell them they should probably get in the habit of locking their computers, but they don’t listen to me. So I’ve created a simple project to hack my friends and show them the importance of computer security. All I need to do is wait for them to leave their computer unlocked for a few seconds, open up their terminal, and type a single, short command.
  • Citibank IT guy deliberately wiped routers, shut down 90% of firm’s networks across America
    It was just after 6pm on December 23, 2013, and Lennon Ray Brown, a computer engineer at the Citibank Regents Campus in Irving, Texas, was out for revenge. Earlier in the day, Brown – who was responsible for the bank’s IT systems – had attended a work performance review with his supervisor. It hadn’t gone well. Brown was now a ticking time bomb inside the organisation, waiting for his opportunity to strike. And with the insider privileges given to him by the company, he had more of an opportunity to wreak havoc than any external hacker.
  • Explo-Xen! Bunker buster bug breaks out guests from hypervisor
    A super-bug in the Xen hypervisor may allow privileged code running in guests to escape to the underlying host. This means, on vulnerable systems, malicious administrators within virtual machines can potentially break out of their confines and start interfering with the host server and other guests. This could be really bad news for shared environments. All versions of open-source Xen are affected (CVE-2016-6258, XSA-182) although it is only potentially exploitable on x86 hardware running paravirtualized (PV) guests. The bug was discovered by Jérémie Boutoille of Quarkslab, and publicly patched on Tuesday for Xen versions 4.3 to 4.7 and the latest bleeding-edge code.
  • Intel Puts Numbers on the Security Talent Shortage
    The cybersecurity shortfall in the workforce remains a critical vulnerability for companies and nations, according to an Intel Security report being issued today. Eighty-two percent of surveyed respondents reported a shortage of security skills, and respondents in every country said that cybersecurity education is deficient.

Android Leftovers

today's howtos

Server Administration

  • Bash Tips for Linux Sysadmins
    The Bash shell is a fundamental Linux tool and, in this era of containers and clusters and microservices, good old-fashioned Linux system administration skills are as relevant as ever. Today, we'll learn about running other command shells, Bash built-ins, configuration files, and shell expansion.
  • Poll: How do you abbreviate system administrator?
  • 5 tools to support distributed sysadmin teams
    Remotely-distributed system administration teams provide around-the-clock coverage without anyone losing sleep, and have the benefit of drawing from a global talent pool. The OpenStack global infrastructure team relies on these five open source tools to communicate, and to coordinate our work.