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Google OS Expands: MS, Apple and Linux Need Not Worry

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Google

It's wild, but for a company that has continuously pointed out their lack of interest in getting into the desktop market, Google sure has been pushing the application side of things awfully hard lately. Think about it, why in the world have they been so confident that their web applications would be enough to sway the preexisting habits of the typical PC user? Simple, because Google knew that they would one day be offering both online and offline Web applications.

For the first time, a lot of what Google has been doing over the years with hiring all of these open source developers, sponsoring Firefox and so on, is becoming very clear now: Google Gears.

Well, how about the Google Reader as one such example?

Now here is the wild part: Google has actually achieved making software installation completely cross platform, and they did it seamlessly. While they have yet to nail on apps that would not have a need to access the Internet yet, I suspect that this is on their "to do" list for some point in the future.

More Here.




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