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The Fedora 7 Year Itch

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Linux
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I have been using Fedora (formerly known as Fedora Core) since the first version came out. Following a bad experience with Fedora Core 2, I stuck to the odd numbered versions - invoking the Star Trek movie rule in reverse. I had been running Fedora Core 5 on my main workstation since March of 2006 and I was eager to get the upcoming Fedora 7 (they had now dropped the Core part of the name) up and running. For most Linux enthusiasts, a year is a long time to go without an update. Unfortunately, for technical reasons, the removal of the Core from Fedora resulted in some delays. Fedora 7's release was pushed to the end of May. I had originally intended to wait, but along came Ubuntu Studio, about which I was curious, so I decided to install that instead of the new Fedora. My experience, overall, was good and I have kept it running and I am happy with it. I was still curious about the new Fedora as well, so when it was finally released on May 31, I downloaded the Live-CD-with-KDE version, burned the CD and put it in my 'to-do' basket. I have another machine which is very similar to my own workstation - a three-year-old Pentium IV with 526MB of RAM with an ATI Rage with on board Ethernet and sound. In other words, it's a very common machine that might be found in any home. This past weekend, I decided to install Fedora 7 on it and give it a whirl. Here are some of my observations.

First of all, compared with conditions in 1998, when I first started with Linux, installing any mainstream distribution (and some of the non-mainstream ones as well) is a relatively easy process if you're dealing with fairly common hardware.

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