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Barloworld builds on open source, Drupal

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Drupal

Automotive engineers Barloworld CVT Technologies have set up on online presence using open source software and the Drupal content management system.
Obsidian Switch recently completed the work on a new website for Barloworld CVT Technologies.

A subsidiary of Barloworld, CVT Technologies has developed a revolutionary new gearbox for the automotive industry and required a website to facilitate its business.

"The company has just acquired patent rights for a new gearbox that we have developed," says Jan Naude, managing director of Barloworld CVT Technologies. "The product has been in development since 2002 and is now being marketed internationally. A prototype has already been tested in a car in South Africa."

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The World Bank contracted with the software firm Development Seed to build the new program, with additional input from the World Resources Institute. Development Seed relied on the popular open-source content management system Drupal for its core code. Last week the bank announced that version 1.0 of BuzzMonitor was available for free download to all comers, and suggested that it was particularly applicable to nonprofit organizations interested in monitoring what the Web was saying about them. (The decision to open-source BuzzMonitor need not be taken as some kind of altruistic move by the bank. By using base code that is protected by the free software GNU General Public License, my understanding is that the bank was required to make any modifications or add-ons freely available.)

The World Bank goes open-source

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