Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Rockstar Games blames Hot Coffee on hackers

Filed under
Gaming

Following nearly two weeks of building controversy, Take-Two Interactive subsidiary Rockstar Games today addressed charges that the PC version of its best-seller, Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, contains sexually explicit minigames unlockable by a widely available mod.

In a statement, Rockstar claimed it is not responsible for the so-called "Hot Coffee" mod. Instead, the company said it was the result of "the work of a determined group of hackers who have gone to significant trouble to alter scenes in the official version of the game."

Two ongoing investigations--one by the US-based Entertainment Software Ratings Board (ESRB) and another by an arm of the Australian government--are examining the popular crime game. Specifically, they are looking at whether the sex minigames and nude models featured in them are based on preexisting code, accessed via the mod, or were introduced by the mod itself.

The publisher, which has a reputation for being reticent with the press, has said little since the "Hot Coffee" mod was uncovered. Since then, the debate over the mod's origin has prompted stories in the general media, enthusiast press, and major business and finance outlets.

Today's statement not only fingers hackers as creating the mod, but it also goes into some detail about their modus operandi: "Hackers created the 'Hot Coffee' modification by disassembling and then combining, recompiling and altering the game's source code."

Rockstar added it intends to take steps to ensure the Hot Coffee mod is neutralized. "Since the 'Hot Coffee' scenes cannot be created without intentional and significant technical modifications and reverse-engineering of the game's source code, we are currently investigating ways that we can increase the security protection of the source code."

In addition to addressing the mod's origin, Rockstar also updated the industry on its compliance with the ESRB investigation, saying it was doing all it could to aid the ratings board.

"We are continuing work diligently to assist the Entertainment Software Ratings Board (ESRB) as it investigates the circumstances surrounding the recently discovered "hot coffee" modification. ... We remain confident that the ESRB assigned Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas the correct rating, M (Mature 17+)."

By Curt Feldman
GameSpot

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

US Military To Launch Open Source Academy

Open source software, which has become increasingly common throughout the US military from unmanned drones to desktops, has now been enlisted as a career option for military personnel. In September, Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center will open a Linux certification academy, marking the first time such a training program has been hosted on a military base. Read more

Video: TedX talk - Richard Stallman

Well, vp9/opus in a webm container have been supported by both Firefox and Google Chrome for several releases now... so enjoy it in your web browser. Read more

Eclipse Luna for Fedora 20

If you are a Fedora Eclipse user, then you're probably saddened since the release of Eclipse Luna (4.4) because you are still using Eclipse Kepler (4.3) on Fedora 20. Well, be saddened no longer because Eclipse Luna is now available for Fedora 20 as a software collection! A software collection is simply a set of RPMs whose contents are isolated from the rest of your system such that they do not modify, overwrite or otherwise conflict with anything in the main Fedora repositories. This allows you install multiple versions of a software stack side-by-side, without them interfering with one another. More can be read about this mechanism on the software collections website. The Eclipse Luna software collection lives in a separate yum repository, which must be configured by clicking on this link to install the release package. Read more