Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Domain Hijacking Takes ICANN Spotlight

Filed under
Security

The report, announced Wednesday during an international meeting of the ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) in Luxembourg, followed at least two high-profile incidents this year of what is known as domain-name hijacking.

The committee advises the domain-name system overseer's board of directors and constituents such as the registrars that sell domain names to individuals and business and the registries that manage domains such as .com and .net.

Committee members expressed optimism that the report will lead to swift action, but it was still unclear as of late Wednesday whether ICANN's board planned to address the report's findings and recommendations at its meeting later this week.

The report left ICANN's recently changed policy for the transfer of domain names without blame in domain hijacking, although others in the domain-name industry have raised concerns that the change will fuel more stolen domain names. The new policy had focused on streamlining the process of transferring a domain.

The ICANN committee recommended 10 fixes for hijacking, which ranged from more public awareness and a domain-name emergency hotline to potentially stricter verification of the identity of domain-name holders and better record keeping of registrations.

One technical recommendation focused on the use of registrar locks and domain-name holder passwords. The report suggests that registrars use locks, which prevent a domain-name change until the name holder unlocks the name, and consider using a specification called "authInfo," which essentially password protects a domain name.

Currently, the authInfo password is not available for .com or .net, both of which are managed by VeriSign Inc. But VeriSign has said it plans to add the support, according to the report. Other domains, such as .org, .biz and .net, use the passwords.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%

Add-on board expands i.MX6 UL SBC

MYIR released an add-on board for its Linux-driven, i.MX6 UL-based MYS-6ULX SBC that adds a second LAN port, plus CAN, RS485, camera, audio, and RTC. In April, MYIR released a Linux-powered MYS-6ULX SBC, which was notable for being available in two different versions using NXP’s low power, Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) or the more affordable, and almost identical i.MX6 ULL SoC. Now, MYIR has released an “MYB-6ULX Expansion Board” designed to stack onto either model. The $21.20 accessory adds a second 10/100 Ethernet port to the MYS-6ULX, as well as new CAN, RS485, audio, micro-USB, RTC, and camera functions. Read more

Hardware: PocketBeagle, Purism Librem 5, Aaeon Embedded PCs

Finding the Mainframers of the Future Through Open Source Ecosystem Development

Speak the word “mainframe” to many millennial techies, and the first things that likely come to mind are in the form of grainy sepia photos of floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall computers with big spinning tapes. But that’s far from the reality of the modern mainframe. Imagine instead up to 240 10-core, 5.2ghz processors, 32TB of RAIM (redundant array of independent memory), hardware-based encryption, and fully hot-swappable hardware components. Those are the specs of the newly released IBM z14 – a single machine that could replace the computing resources of an average corporate data center with room to spare. Read more