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Experiences with the Oxygen Style

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A few words before I rant (just a little) about the new oxygen style. I do like the working aspects of it, that is the tabbars, the hover-effect on the menubar. The Scrollbars look good, so it is on the right track IMHO. Still I’m a bit worried about its quality on older or not 100% supported hardware, so here’s what I’ve got when trying the oxygen style.

First of all I think I should explain my graphics hardware, because I can’t judge which problems come from the style and which might be problems of my graphics driver. I’m working on a laptop here, which has a Radeon Mobility 9200. I’m using the open source radeon driver, because the proprietary one is a) not open source and Cool is the worst piece of driver I’ve ever tested. Seriously, its crashing X11 more often then it boots it up. Also noteworthy is that I’m running Xinerama here, not with the MergedFB mode, but with plain X11 Xinerama, the reason for this is simply that I couldn’t get MergedFB to work reliably and to provide the resolution I want - CRT with 1400×1050 and Laptop with 1680×1050.

Thats for the basics. Now I present to you 2 screenshots which show how the style looks here on the above mentioned hardware:

More Here.

Import KDE4 Oxygen Icons into your KDE 3.x setup

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