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Google flirts with online OS

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Google

It's only a matter of time before Google unveils a full-fledged online operating system. This week, Microsoft's biggest rival rolled out a new version of Docs & Spreadsheets - its online answer to Word and Excel - adding Windows-like folders, an improved search engine, and an all-around prettier interface.

Previously, Docs & Spreadsheets organized files using a tagging method reminiscent of Gmail, Google's web-based email client. With the addition of folders, the service feels much more like a classic desktop GUI. You can even move documents from folder to folder via drag and drop.

"Almost from the day we launched people have been clamoring for folders," wrote technical lead Ron Schneider, on the official Google Docs & Spreadsheets blog. In other words, they weren't into the tags thing.

One user summed it up quite nicely on the Google discussion forum. "Folders is a great move," he said. "Everyone knows what folders are, but tags/labels still don't make sense to my Dad and others."

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