Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Finally Moves Beyond the Fringe

Filed under

Linux has rocked the foundations of the server and client operating system market around the world - and this has been felt in Australia as much as anywhere else. In all company sizes and industries, Linux is finding its way into organisations - and it has moved beyond the web, file and print server into core business applications.

IDC Australia's recent report "Australia Linux Adoption - An End-User Study" draws on a recent study into Linux usage and adoption plans amongst 300 businesses in Australia. The report analyses the findings of the study and examines the future impact of the growth of Linux - particularly as a server operating environment. The results in the report are weighted to represent the Australian business market.

The key factors driving the growth of Linux are:

  • The availability of more and more applications on the Linux platform

  • The decreased TCO of an IT solution (involving a Linux deployment)
  • The security of the Linux platform
  • The increased availability of management applications for Linux

"Linux goes beyond providing a cheap server or desktop operating environment - it allows companies in some industries and sectors that have previously been unable to deploy what were traditionally expensive business applications to deploy them and compete more effectively," said Tim Sheedy, Research Director of Software and Services at IDC Australia.

"However, there are many impediments to the widespread deployment of Linux - as price and availability of applications are both driving the deployment of Linux in Australia. Any vendor that can counteract these factors has the ability to derail the Linux train," added Mr Sheedy.

Linux will continue to rock the foundations of the SOE market for a number of years. Linux is allowing organisations to access many applications at a fraction of the cost of what they have previously paid.

As Microsoft NT running on an x86 platform undercut the Unix vendors in the late 90s, Linux running on x86 will further improve on this equation. Software vendors are frequently offering enterprise-class applications for less than 25% of what companies are used to paying by deploying their database and applications in the Linux environment. After much talk, debate, and speculation, it has become clear that Linux has truly arrived.


More in Tux Machines

A History Of Everyday Linux User's 350 Blog Posts

This article is something of a landmark as it is the 350th post on Everyday Linux User. I took last week off to celebrate. Well actually I went away with the family down to England for a few days and didn't take a computer with me. I did take in Alnwick Castle however which is the location for Hogwarts from the Harry Potter films. Read more

Kodi 17 "Krypton" Beta 4 Released with ARMv8A 64-bit Builds for Android, Fixes

Today, October 25, 2016, Martijn Kaijser had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability of the fourth, and probably the last Beta milestone of the upcoming Kodi 17 open-source and cross-platform media center software. Read more

GNOME's Epiphany 3.24 Web Browser to Use Firefox Sync Service, HTTPS Everywhere

The GNOME developers are preparing to release the first development version of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, versioned 3.23.1, and we can't help but notice that some of the core apps were updated recently. Read more

Suse: Question. What do you call second-place in ARM enterprise server linux? Answer: Red Hat

ARM TechCon Suse is claiming victory over Red Hat by announcing – and these caveats are all crucial – "the first commercial enterprise Linux distribution optimized for ARM AArch64 architecture servers." In plainer English, Suse has developed an enterprise-grade Linux distribution that runs on 64-bit ARM servers (should you happen to ever find one). Suse claims this software is a world first because it is a finished commercial product, thus beating Red Hat to the punch: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for ARM is still only available as a beta-like development preview. Read more