Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

M$ antitrust decision will have to wait for autumn

Filed under
Microsoft

The European Commission will not make a decision on whether Microsoft has complied with its antitrust ruling until after the summer, according to an EC spokesman.

The spokesman said the market test of Microsoft's proposed server interoperability licence has been completed and the EC is now analysing the results. As many civil servants are on leave in August, no decision will be taken until September at the earliest, according to the spokesman. He was unable to say when exactly the verdict was due.

The market test, which started last month, allowed Microsoft's competitors to evaluate the "innovative character of the protocols" and check whether the royalties Microsoft proposes to charge are "reasonable".

If Microsoft passes the market test, no further action will be taken by the EC. But if the company's proposed licence is found to be unsatisfactory, the EC will go back to the software giant and try to resolve these issues, the spokesman said.

This is already the second version of the server interoperability license - the original version was rejected in March by the EC for a number of reasons, including its unjustifiably high royalty fees and its exclusion of open source vendors.

In its latest offer, Microsoft agreed to provide some server interoperability information free of charge but these royalty-free concessions have been labelled "pointless" by a firm involved in the market test. The firm, an open source consultancy, claimed that the information is already available on the internet, is incomplete and in some cases even incorrect.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews AJ Jordon of gplenforced.org

So basically Bradley Kuhn gave a talk at FOSDEM '17 about GPL enforcement and I was like, wow, it sucks how many companies and people think that enforcing the GPL is a bad idea. I mean, if you disagree with copyleft that's fine (though I personally would argue with that position), but then you should use a suitable license. Like MIT. The very idea that we shouldn't enforce the GPL just doesn't make sense to me because it suggests that the text of the license is watery and unimportant. I don't know about you, but when I say I want my programs to respect users' freedom, I mean it. So GPL enforcement is important. It seemed to me that there are probably a lot of developers out there who want to support GPL enforcement but don't have a good way to voice that support. gplenforced.org is essentially a quick and dirty hack I wrote to make that dead-simple. Read more

Red Hat General and Financial News

today's howtos