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A Review of openSUSE 10.2

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SUSE

Back in the day, when I first started using Linux, Novell's SUSE Linux was the first distribution that I came across that actually worked with my wireless card. Over the course of a year or so, I went through versions 9.3, 10.0, and 10.1. Needless to say, a lot has changed since SUSE 9.3 that makes the distribution ever more welcoming to new and advanced users alike. In this review, I'll take a look at the latest openSUSE release, 10.2, and see how it stacks up to its previous versions and other distros.

The Install:

Installing openSUSE 10.2 is not a very difficult thing to do. Download options consist mainly of 5 CDs (with an optional add-on CD) or 1 DVD in the common architectures (x86, x86_64, PPC, and IA64). Also available is a LiveDVD which lets you try openSUSE 10.2 before installing.

The installer is quite intuitive, and provides ample support along the way in the form of a sidebar displaying helpful information about the current step. For those liking to customize almost every detail of their installation, the SUSE installer is superb.

More Here.




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