Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Kicking Around Open Source, Part 1: Blog Hot Spots

Filed under
Web

Sure, you can walk into any big-box bookstore and see several shelves full of volumes about open source software -- about why you should use it, how to use it, and what to do when you stumble on problems. Likewise, the Web sites of Linux-related companies and organizations are chock-full of white papers and articles analyzing one or another's position on open source hot topics.

However, the real action for discussion of Linux and the hundreds of other open source software packages out there occurs in real time among ordinary people unconstrained by the limits of print publishers or Web site approval processes. Blogs and podcasts are the preferred communication channels for open source enthusiasts, and that comes as no big surprise.

"The very nature of open source development is driven by collaboration," Michael Goulde, senior analyst with Forrester Research, told LinuxInsider. "What really is needed is a vehicle for 24/7/365 communication."

More Here.




More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

ACPI, kernels and contracts with firmware

This ends up being a pain in the neck in the x86 world, but it could be much worse. Way back in 2008 I wrote something about why the Linux kernel reports itself to firmware as "Windows" but refuses to identify itself as Linux. The short version is that "Linux" doesn't actually identify the behaviour of the kernel in a meaningful way. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the kernel can deal with buffers being passed when the spec says it should be a package. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the OS knows how to deal with an HPET. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the OS can reinitialise graphics hardware. Read more