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ID card back on AU agenda

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Prime Minister John Howard has put national identity cards back on the agenda in the wake of the London bombings and a damning report on immigration department blunders.

Howard said the controversial cards, which were rejected in 1987, should be considered as a way of better identifying Australians in the wake of the London bombings.

"This is an issue that ought to be back on the table," Howard told reporters in Sydney.

"But back on the table as part of inevitably looking at everything in the wake of the terrible tragedy in London."

The call follows a highly critical report by former federal police chief Mick Palmer, which found policy developed on the run was behind a series of mix-ups which led to the mistaken detention of Australian resident Cornelia Rau and the wrongful deportation of Australian citizen Vivian Alvarez.

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