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ATI has released 64-Bit drivers

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Software

According to AMDZone and ATI's own site, ATI has released 64-bit drivers for XFree86 and Xorg. Here's a link the download page.

More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Infusing your UX writing with brand personality

    Brand can often be overused as a content term, but it can be overlooked as a content strategy. Plenty of folks rave about building their brand, promoting their company brand, creating brand recognition, and so on. But how many of those people actually consider the vast array of content channels that should be on-brand? Yes, blog posts and other marketing collateral should reflect your brand, but you might be overlooking something else: your product’s user interface (UI). I’m not specifically referring to the colors, logos, and icons (although those brand elements are extremely important). I’m referring to the words in the UI. These words are usually called "microcopy" or "UX copy," and the act of creating them is called "UX writing."

  • Open Data Hub 0.7 adds support for Kubeflow 1.0

    Open Data Hub (ODH) is a blueprint for building an AI-as-a-Service (AIaaS) platform on Red Hat OpenShift 4. Version 0.7 of Open Data Hub includes support for deploying Kubeflow 1.0 on OpenShift, as well as increased component testing on the OpenShift continuous integration (CI) system. This article explores the recent updates.

  • Sysadmin careers: How my team distributes work over holidays, nights, and weekends

    Well, I thought this would be an interesting topic to explore because I'm working in a team most sysadmins probably dream of—we don't work over holidays, nights, or weekends. Our mode of operation dictates that everyone works eight hours a day from Monday to Friday. Office hours are between 6:45 am and 8:00 pm, but most of us keep to the typical workday schedule of 8:00 am to 5:00 pm with an hour for lunch. That means there is no operations team present onsite or even on call during nights, weekends, and holidays. (Full disclosure—we do put in an extra hour here and there, but only for some of the bigger migrations, e.g., a new SAN goes live, or we do a migration of a whole mail system including mailboxes and calendars. Some guys will briefly check-in at night or during the weekend to see if the jobs are still running. But, as a rule, other typical maintenance tasks like release upgrades take place during the usual office hours). Sounds awesome, right? Unfortunately, we're not hiring at the moment. When I tell people that we don't have to work on weekends and holidays and don't have to be on call at night, they usually ask, "but what do you do when something breaks?" So we work 8x5, but our clients need our services to be available 24x7. To make that possible, you have to consider a few important things when it comes to product selection and service design.

  • Boosting manufacturing efficiency and product quality with AI/ML, edge computing and Kubernetes

    The manufacturing industry has consistently used technology to fuel innovation, production optimization and operations. Now, with the combination of edge computing and AI/ML, manufacturers can benefit from bringing processing power closer to data that, when put into action faster, can help to proactively discover of potential errors at the assembly line, help improve product quality, and even reduce potential downtime through predictive maintenance and in the unlikely event of a drop in communications with a central/core site, individual manufacturing plants can continue to operate. [...] To achieve this manufacturing vision, along with the continued digitalization of factories, manufacturers must now take a hard look at their operations and technology to meet these new opportunities. It requires factory systems to mirror the best practices of a modern IT environment based on containers, Kubernetes, agile development, AI/ML and automation. All of these technologies, coincidentally, are components of open hybrid cloud, an IT footprint that can be used to accommodate these manufacturing technologies, from the edge of the network to the factory floor.

  • Michel Alexandre Salim: Breaking out of walled gardens

    I have been progressively getting more and more dissatisfied with the grip Big Tech firms have over our collective lives, and have been gradually pruning my use of proprietary technologies over the past months.

  • Red Hat Offers Certification Exams Online in Response to COVID-19

    With travel and in-person gatherings made difficult by COVID-19, Red Hat is now offering certification testing online - and using a unique solution to deter cheating.

Devices With Linux, Mostly Raspberry Pi

  • Terminal Zero: Building the Ultimate Raspberry Pi Zero Computer

    The new edition has no keyboard in favor of a touchscreen interface. The case is custom designed and no only has a huge selection of ports to access but also additional buttons. The unit is completely wireless, using a LiPo battery for power. There's a small speaker inside but you can also use headphones via a 3.5mm jack.

  • Will This Speed up Your Raspberry Pi Browsing by up to 1200%?

    Puffin manages these incredible speeds because the content is rendered remotely on their encrypted cloud servers. A JavaScript engine is used to pre-process and compress web pages before they arrive at your screen. This can be interpreted as a proxy server by some sites, and may affect the content that is available to you.

  • Odroid H2 as ventilator cooling ventilation airmachine

    finally summer and climate change have both reached Europe and had several weeks of 30 C straight… without ventilation, anything above 30 is just “too much to think” (so maybe the brain CPU also would need active cooling?) of course the user could buy a fan online… or try to use CPU fans to do the job

  • Track your punches with Raspberry Pi
  • Garage Minder

    A Raspberry Pi Zero W is used to open and close the garage door. I did not have a convenient outlet to plug in a power supply for the Pi. So my Pi gets its power from the existing garage opener control wiring for the wall button. Typically, there is 24 volt AC available here, though it may be a lower voltage in older openers. A Buck converter down-regulates this voltage to 5 v DC. A battery allows the Pi to continue when the wall button is momentarily pressed, and the power is shorted out. We need two diodes so that the forward drop (1.4v) stops the 6v battery from continuously discharging into the 5v power supply. The battery is barely used, so it should last for a long time. If an outlet is conveniently available, then a regular 5v micro USB charger can be used.

Programming Leftovers

  • Go filesystems and file embedding

    The Go team has recently published several draft designs that propose changes to the language, standard library, and tooling: we covered the one on generics back in June. Last week, the Go team published two draft designs related to files: one for a new read-only filesystem interface, which specifies a minimal interface for filesystems, and a second design that proposes a standard way to embed files into Go binaries (by building on the filesystem interface). Embedding files into Go binaries is intended to simplify deployments by including all of a program's resources in a single binary; the filesystem interface design was drafted primarily as a building block for that. There has been a lot of discussion on the draft designs, which has been generally positive, but there are some significant concerns. Russ Cox, technical lead of the Go team, and Rob Pike, one of the creators of Go, are the authors of the design for the filesystem interface. Cox is also an author of the design for file embedding along with longtime Go contributor Brad Fitzpatrick. Additionally, Cox created YouTube video presentations of each design for those who prefer that format (the filesystem interface video and the file-embedding video).

  • a Piece of Note on Unicode Encoding for CJK characters (with my simple Caesar encoding script)
  • Plasmoid with C++

    So the goal is pretty simple, and all I have to do is to find a way to share information from KClock to the plasmoid. However the solution isn’t that trivia. As it turned out, DBus is perferred for IPC(Inter-process communication). Before start working on plasmoid, I need to expose some of the class of KClock to DBus first. Since KClock is built upon Qt, I choose to using Q-DBus as it will save a lot of effort than using low level interface. Now the problem is - I don’t know how to use Q-DBus. As usual, I went to the Qt documentation and to my surprise, it spent most content to describe the concept of DBus and compared to Qt’s signal/slot machinism. Although useful as it is, lack of examples meaning I still didn’t know how I can use it in my code. Thankfully, KDE has its own tutorial about DBus and it provides multiple examples. You can find it here.

  • How to use printf to format output

    When I started learning Unix, I was introduced to the echo command pretty early in the process. Likewise, my initial Python lesson involved the print function. Picking up C++ and Java introduced me to cout and systemout. It seemed every language proudly had a convenient one-line method of producing output and advertised it like it was going out of style.

  • Ceph – the practical storage solution for companies of all sizes

    Ceph was conceived by Sage A. Weil, who developed it while writing his dissertation and published it in 2006. He then led the project with his company Intank Storage. In 2014, the company was acquired by RedHat, with Weil staying on as the chief architect, in charge of the software’s development.

    Ceph only works on Linux systems, for example CentOS, Debian, Fedora, RedHat/RHEL, OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu. Accessing the software through Windows systems cannot be done directly, but is possible through the use of iSCSI (Internet Small Computer System Interface). As such, Ceph is particularly suitable for use in data centers that make their storage space available over servers, and for cloud solutions of any kind that use software to provide storage.

    We have complied a list of the most important features of Ceph: [...]

  • "Structural pattern matching" for Python, part 1

    We last looked at the idea of a Python "match" or "switch" statement back in 2016, but it is something that has been circulating in the Python community both before and since that coverage. In June it was raised again, with a Python Enhancement Proposal (PEP) supporting it: PEP 622 ("Structural Pattern Matching"). As that title would imply, the match statement proposed in the PEP is actually a pattern-matching construct with many uses. While it may superficially resemble the C switch statement, a Python match would do far more than simply choose a chunk of code to execute based on the value of an expression.

  • Federico Mena-Quintero: "Rust does not have a stable ABI"

    These are extremely valid concerns to be addressed by people like myself who propose that chunks of infrastructural libraries should be done in Rust. So, let's begin. The first part of this article is a super-quick introduction to shared libraries and how Linux distributions use them. If you already know those things, feel free to skip to the "Rust does not have a stable ABI" section.

Software: FreeCAD, Text Editors, Man-Pages and Kiwi TCMS

  • Checking out FreeCAD

    Our look at running a CNC milling machine using open-source software led me to another tool worth looking at: FreeCAD. I wasn't previously familiar with the program, so I decided to check it out. In this article I will walk through my experiences with using FreeCAD for the first time to do a variety of CNC-related tasks I normally would have used a commercial product for. I had varying degrees of success in my endeavors, but in the end came away with a positive opinion. FreeCAD is an LGPL v2+ licensed CAD and CAM program written in Python and C++. The first release of the project was in 2002, and its last stable version 0.18.4 was released in October 2019. The project's GitHub page indicates that it has 271 contributors with new commits happening often (generally more than 50 a week). Beyond code contributions, FreeCAD has a welcoming community with active forums to answer any questions users might have along the way. FreeCAD is designed to be cross-platform, supporting Linux, macOS, and Windows, with binary releases provided by the OS-independent package and environment management system Conda. I decided to take on a relatively simple CNC project: milling a new street-address sign for my home. The plan called for a 700mm x 150mm sign, and I decided to mill it out of a plank of maple wood. The design I have in mind is pretty straightforward, so it should be a great way to put FreeCAD through a test on a real project. I also looked at using FreeCAD for taking existing models that are available online with an open license and importing them for milling (in this case, a wooden spoon). It is worth noting that before this effort I had never used FreeCAD before. My personal goal is to become fluent enough with FreeCAD that I can replace my dependence on the commercial CAD software I presently use in my design work. The goal of this article, however, is to share what my experience with FreeCAD was, and provide a glimpse of FreeCAD from the perspective of an inexperienced user.

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  • 9 Best Emacs-Like Text Editors

    Over the years, one of the most emotive areas in the world of Linux is the choice of text editor. Some people are strong advocates of Vim, others prefer Emacs. And there’s tons of other text editors available with strong backing. Having robust opinions is the way the land lies in Linux. Emacs has a long and revered history. The original program was written in 1976 as a set of macros for an existing text editor called TECO. Emacs originally was an acronym for Editor MACroS, unifying the many TECO command sets and key bindings. TECO is both a character-oriented text editor and an interpreted programming language for text manipulation. Emacs has come a long way since 1976. It offers a robust Lisp interpreter that is hugely extensible and hackable. It brought to light lots of novel concepts such as an infinite clipboard, tree-based exploration of history, a reverse variable search, structural editing of code, and recursive editing that let you stop what you are doing, perform other edits, and then revert back to the original task. Emacs is an incremental programming environment, a mutable environment that provides functionality without applications.

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  • Michael Kerrisk (manpages): man-pages-5.08 is released

    I've released man-pages-5.08. The release tarball is available on kernel.org. The browsable online pages can be found on man7.org. The Git repository for man-pages is available on kernel.org. This release resulted from patches, bug reports, reviews, and comments from more than 30 contributors. The release includes more than 190 commits that change around 340 pages.

  • QGIS has chosen Kiwi TCMS

    We are happy to announce that QGIS has chosen Kiwi TCMS for the basis of their Quality Assurance methodology and infrastructure improvement program! Kiwi TCMS will play a central role in storing test case definitions, organizing test cycles, and assigning and tracking test executions by testers from the QGIS community.