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'Doom' film shoots for video game style

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Movies
Gaming

A movie version of classic video game series "Doom" takes some visual cues from the world of games, according to a clip of the film shown on Sunday.

The original "Doom" was one of the first video game runaway successes when it debuted more than a decade ago and it helped establish the first-person-shooter genre in which killing aliens, mutants or demons is central to the plot.

In first-person-shooters, the player often looks at the world down a gunsite, and that is exactly the point of view in part of the movie, according to a clip shown at the Comic-Con convention in San Diego.

The movie starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson follows a team battling demons on Mars, where a research lab experimenting has discovered horrible secrets. In a clip from the unfinished movie, the camera closes in on an eye of a soldier - and then "turns around" and begins watching the world and telling the tale from the soldier's point of view.

A cheer went up through the video-game fan crowd as two hands reached up in front of the screen and shoved ammunition into a gun a typical player point-of-view shot. The camera then continued from the shooter's point of view as he wandered through a dark building, blasting and blowing up demons jumping in from every angle.

The original "Doom" was launched in 1994 by developer id Software and last year publisher Activision Inc. released "Doom 3," with a similar plot line as the new movie. Universal Pictures plans to open the movie on Oct. 21, 2005.

Source.

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