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Pardus 2007.2 - A Review

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The image file for Pardus 2007.2 comes in at around 700MB, but is also available in a 700MB live CD flavour. Please note that the live CD is NOT capable of installing the system onto your hard drive like you can with most live CDs . The installer was by no means difficult to use - asking for the usual information regarding partition details. This is followed by the installation of the system and a few final questions before asking the user to reboot and start using Pardus. The whole process took approximately 30 minutes, approximately double the time that I have been noticing with other distributions (although much faster than Windows).

While the installer was nothing to brag about, it was simple to use and offered the ability to read release notes and other information while the system files were copied. This is where it was clear that the documentation is not natively written in English, but it was definitely readable.


This section will be quite brief as the overall feel is just like any other distribution using the KDE desktop environment. The default look, including background, theme, icons, and menus, was very clean - offering a professional appeal. Below is a screenshot of the default desktop (click for full-screen).

More Here.

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