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Our Linux Values

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So Linux is making its mark around the globe. But is it really making a difference? Well, Microsoft has had to offer a stripped-down, lower-priced version of Windows to compete with Linux. Many governments are putting Linux (and open-source software in general) on their short list for IT acquisitions. And Linux is being customized for local needs by local companies, giving them a stake in the IT business.

But there's something more going on -- something that goes beyond simple measures of business advantage.

Linux is exporting our values around the world. And we need that.

What values? Competition. Cooperation. And opportunity.

And who are we exporting those values to? Everyone involved with Linux. But especially those who have the most technical smarts and the greatest business vision. In other words, the people who can make the biggest difference in the years to come -- wherever they may be.

Does that sound too good to be true? It's not.

Linux is all about competition -- competition of brain power, technical skills and experience. Got lots of money? High social status? A pretty face? None of that helps. To compete for a place in the Linux world, you need a PC, an Internet connection and a brain. Your fellow propeller-heads will judge you on your ideas, your code and your other contributions. Anyone can play.

Knowing English helps. But knowing C++ or Python helps a lot more. Fractured English is forgivable as long as the code is good.

It's good code that competes to be part of the Linux kernel. Good utilities that compete to be part of each Linux distribution. And good distributions that compete for users.

True, Linux isn't the only thing spreading the values of competition around the globe. Soccer does that, too. But soccer is about teams competing against each other. Linux is about individual competition.

Full Story.

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