Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Our Linux Values

Filed under
Misc

So Linux is making its mark around the globe. But is it really making a difference? Well, Microsoft has had to offer a stripped-down, lower-priced version of Windows to compete with Linux. Many governments are putting Linux (and open-source software in general) on their short list for IT acquisitions. And Linux is being customized for local needs by local companies, giving them a stake in the IT business.

But there's something more going on -- something that goes beyond simple measures of business advantage.

Linux is exporting our values around the world. And we need that.

What values? Competition. Cooperation. And opportunity.

And who are we exporting those values to? Everyone involved with Linux. But especially those who have the most technical smarts and the greatest business vision. In other words, the people who can make the biggest difference in the years to come -- wherever they may be.

Does that sound too good to be true? It's not.

Linux is all about competition -- competition of brain power, technical skills and experience. Got lots of money? High social status? A pretty face? None of that helps. To compete for a place in the Linux world, you need a PC, an Internet connection and a brain. Your fellow propeller-heads will judge you on your ideas, your code and your other contributions. Anyone can play.

Knowing English helps. But knowing C++ or Python helps a lot more. Fractured English is forgivable as long as the code is good.

It's good code that competes to be part of the Linux kernel. Good utilities that compete to be part of each Linux distribution. And good distributions that compete for users.

True, Linux isn't the only thing spreading the values of competition around the globe. Soccer does that, too. But soccer is about teams competing against each other. Linux is about individual competition.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Living The Linux Laptop Lifestyle

Another great advantage of open source software: you can run it off of a flash drive before installing it. And I have to admit that I loved Linux Lite's out-of-the-box feel, so much so that I reconsidered installing my number two selection: LXLE, which is designed for underpowered older machines. According to a label on the bottom of my Toughbook, this pre-Linux laptop was decommissioned in 2005, making it well over ten years old. And so I replaced the RAM, installed Linux Lite, and after a short period, I was back to living a Linux laptop lifestyle while waiting for my charger. Read more

Mentor Embedded Linux gains cloud-based IoT platform

Mentor announced a “Mentor Embedded IoT Framework” platform that builds on top of Mentor Embedded Linux with cloud-based IoT cloud services ranging from device authentication and provisioning to monitoring and diagnostics. Mentor’s Mentor Embedded IoT Framework (MEIF) extends its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) and Nucleus RTOS development platforms to provide cloud services for IoT device management. The platform mediates between these platforms and cloud service backends, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Eclipse IoT, Microsoft Azure, and Siemens MindSphere. Read more

Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more