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Finding the hidden bells and whistles in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox, now in release 2.0, has made huge advancements in Web browsing. Tabbed browsing and anti-phishing protection are its most visible improvements. Other features can be added into the browser through extensions, making this browser do more of users' bidding.

These features are great and certainly make this a favorite browser, but what if there were more? There are additional features hidden beneath Firefox's exterior waiting for you to discover. This article will look at all but one of the hidden items within Mozilla Firefox; the last feature will be looked at separately, as it has the most impact on overall experience when used. I will be covering that page in depth in a later article.

What's 'missing’
The hidden pages of Firefox are configuration items that allow and end users to see and make changes to the way Firefox operates. I will refer to them as the about: pages. They are available through the about: operator. You can see the pages by typing the following commands in the Address field:

More Here (Original).




Also:

Although not officially announced as of yet, Firefox 2.0.0.5 hit mirrors last night. You can download the en-US Linux tarball from here.

Mozilla Firefox 2.0.0.5 has been released and is currently being distributed to Firefox 2 users via the application's built-in software update system. The browser upgrade fixes several security bugs, which are detailed in the Firefox 2.0.0.5 section of the Mozilla Foundation Security Advisories page.

Firefox 2.0.0.5 includes a fix for the firefoxurl:// security exploit, which allows an attacker to use Microsoft Internet Explorer to trick Firefox into executing malicious code. Whether Firefox or IE is responsible for the flaw has been a matter of debate over the past week.

Mozilla Firefox 2.0.0.5 Released with Fix for firefoxurl:// Exploit, Developers' notes

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