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Your First Kernel

Another interesting poll

Do you compile your own Linux kernels?

2.4.22 was THE kernel

atang1 wrote:
It has posix and mosix and USB2.0 emulation from scsi.

It has kudzu and bios drivers and others in /dev.

It has KDE and Gnome and Cups.

IIt has DHCP, dhcpcd.

It has Mozilla 1.2 And sylpheed.

2.6.x is for servers of local distributed data priority and ambiguous drivers for devices made of DSPs. Now added realtime threads in 2.6.21.


I second this.
2.4.22 was really THE perfectly working kernel on my computer years ago.

Wink

My first kernel?

0.97 Yaggdrasil. (Can't spell it any more.) This was 92 Stuck it on my desktop in Newmarket and am remembering it from location. Bought the CD's at U of Toronto Bookstores. Put it up against AIX, SCO and Solaris then got the slack diskette set from Walnut Creek.

But in 86 I was trained on System V Berkley 4.2 and wrote code for it. We had a 200meg hard drive. It was about 6 rack units high x 19" wide on a Modcomp then graduated to a VAX 750 with a DEC VT240.

Asta la Vista

My first kernel?

I had to look up Red Hat 5 on Distrowatch. I'm glad someone keeps track of this stuff. I don't even think I knew what a kernel was back then.

I didn't know DW had that info!

My first version of Linux was a boxed publisher's version of Red Hat 5.2 that was on sale at Costco, of all places. (Only time I've ever seen anything Linux-related there.) Kernel 2.0.36.

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