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Elive 1.0 - A Review

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Linux
Reviews

The first full version of Elive, 1.0, was released at the beginning of July this year to a fair amount of acclaim. It has been touted as one of the most visually appealing distributions, but how does it stake up against the out-of-the-box review style of Shift+Backspace? I have been quite busy with work over the last week and have kept Elive installed on my desktop computer, making it my primary operating system. That being said, I found myself often booting into a live CD version of Linux Mint 3.0 as I generally did not like Elive 1.0. Of course, I do want to give Elive a fair review.

Installation

Elive 1.0 is available in an approximately 700MB live CD image. How do you get the image? Well, unfortunately the creator of Elive wants you to pay to download it. That is right, pay for a Linux distribution before actually using it. While I agree that a distribution with a single developer, such as Elive , does require substantial investment, I find it irritating that the developer REQUIRES payment to download the image (please note that unstable images are available free of charge). In the past I have donated to various Linux projects to help support a product I fully believe in, but how can I be expected to pay before I have a chance to use the distribution? One rebuttal to this comment may be that the creator asks you how much it is worth to you, meaning that you could probably donate $1 and still download the image, but it is the principle that bothers me. That being said, if you search hard enough you will be able to find a mirror that does not require payment, unfortunately, the one that I came across is no longer available.

Okay, the rant is now done!

More Here.




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